Wednesday, September 17, 2014
Search
  
Most Popular
Essays
Graphics Cards
WEB Reviews
Seagate Enterprise Capacity 3.5 V.3 4TB SAS 6Gb/s HDD Review
OCZ Vector 256GB SSD Review @ Custom PC Review
Gigabyte F2A85XM-D3H
NZXT Phantom 630
Auvio Bluetooth Portable Speaker Review
Corsair H90 CPU Cooler Review
BIOSTAR Hi-Fi Z77X (Intel Z77) Motherboard Review
Noctua NH-L9i Cooler Review on Technic3D
Breaking News
Sony To Offer Unity For PlayStation To PlayStation Licensed Developers
Blackberry Introduces Elegant Porsche Design P9983 Smartphone
Club 3D Launches 4K Docking Station
Logitech Gives You Control of Your Smart Home with the New Harmony Living Home Lineup
New iPads And OS X Yosemite Announcements Expected Next Month
Opera Max Data-savings App to be Embedded into MediaTek's LTE SoCs
Nero 2015 Supports Burning via Smartphone, WiFi Streaming
PMC Delivers 16-port SAS and SATA Storage Controllers
Home > Essays > Graphics Cards

Thursday, July 14, 2005
CROSSFIRE vs SLI

1. Introduction - SLI

With SLI getting so much attention and coverage for its high performance and value (it's currently better value and performance to buy two 6600GT's than one single 6800U), ATI was left on the sideline, watching as Nvidia broke one benchmark record after another. Seeing the public's response to such a move, ATi secretly began working on a new Multi-GPU architecture of its own which we now know as CrossFire.

Crossfire is a direct answer to SLI, so in order to better understand the differences, we'll go back a little and take a brief look at SLI.

SLI stands for Scalable Link Interface. In order to play a game in SLI mode, you need:
- An nForce 4 SLI powered motherboard with two PCI-Express 16x slots
- Two, identical in every way, VGA cards linked using an SLI bridge connector.
- SLI support for each game through the NVidia driver.

SLI offers 2 rendering modes: Alternate Frame Rendering (AFR) and Split Frame Rendering (SFR).

SFR is the most commonly used and works by splitting the screen in two horizontal portions, each rendered by a different card. If the driver determines the load is just too much for one card to handle, it changes the position of the separating line to balance the load.

First GPU

Second GPU

Final results of Scalable Link Interface (SLI™)

As a result, SLI benchmarks report quite steady framerates, very consistent to increasing resolution or enabling image quality options like Anti-Aliasing and Anisotropic Filtering. Both cards do the best they can and the performance boost against a single card is no doubt obvious.

With that out of the way, let's move on to what the Crossfire platform can offer.




Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message


 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .