Saturday, November 25, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Websites Track Everything You Do, Researchers Found
Atomic Switches Pave The Way For Neuromorphic Chipsets
Samsung to Showcase Large Micro LED TV at CES: report
Samsung Foundry in Advanced Discussions With New Customers for 7nm Chips
Tesla Finished Installing the World's Largest Mega-battery in Australia Within 100 Days
Apple Applies for Patent on Foldable Display
HP Patches Code execution Bug in Enterprise Printers
YouTube Takes More Steps to Tackle Down Videos Inappropriate for Minors
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Toshiba...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, July 19, 2005
Toshiba Prototypes 30 GB HD DVD-R Disc


At the ISOM/ODS '05 event, Toshiba Corp. presented recording and readout results of the HD DVD-R DL, the company's new double layer HD DVD-R disc with a capacity of 30 GB.

The International Symposium on Optical Memory and Optical Data Storage was held this year (July 10-14) at the Hyatt Regency in Waikiki Honolulu, Hawaii.

Toshiba revealed details of the prototype, following a press meeting in May 2005, at which the company only showed its playback signals. Along with the development of an organic dye for the recording layer, the company also established a manufacturing process requiring lower costs than the previous DVD-R DL manufacturing process.

To make an HD-DVD disc double-layered, the company needed to reduce the thickness of the Ag reflection layer, located close to the optical head so thatthe laser beam can reach the other layer (Layer 0) more easily. However, the thinner the Ag reflection layer gets, which also works as a heat sink, the weaker its heat releasing effects become; and therefore the larger the heat interferences between recorded marks grow. Toshiba overcame these problems with an organic dye with good heat conductivity, newly developed in conjunction with raw material manufacturers. This dye is a low to high polarity dye, which increases reflection when exposed.

Conventional 2P (photopolymer) process is used to form the middle layer. In existing double layer DVD-R media, disposable polyolefin stampers are used to transcribe the recording layer's concavities and convexities onto the photopolymer. Toshiba has employed 0.6 mm-thick, polycarbonate injection molded stampers instead of the polyolefin stampers. As a result, polycarbonate once used in stampers can be reused as alternative dummy substrates.

The Blu-Ray response

At the same time, Philips showcased the latest developments and results of its research work on behalf of the rival Blu-Ray camp. The Philips research team announced their successfull testing on BD-R (Blu-Ray Recordable) recording procedures.

Unlike the BD-RE (Blu-Ray Rewritable) disc which is based on the phase-change layer technology, and alternatively to the use of a dye layer, Philips proposed the usage of a Cu/ Si bilayer to be applied as the recording medium in a write-once Blu-ray Disc (BD-R). The write process basically comprises the formation of a CuSi alloy containing 25?30 at. % Si, while any excess Si is left behind as unreacted film. Auger analyses of the laser-written layers indicate that recording consists primarily of the diffusion of Si into Cu.

The results coming from Philips labs indicate that this technology offers adequate results in terms of disc readability and high recording speeds. The very low jitter levels of typically 4%, proved to be achievable with equally thick films of Cu and Si as recording medium.

Philips has successfully tested first recordings on Cu/Si bilayer BD-R media at 1x-7x speeds (25GB, single layer). Note that 7x BD-R speed equals 10x for DVD and 30x for CD. The results indicate that the shortest possible recording time was given at a rotational speed fixed at 10800 rpm, which is equal to 200 km/h! At the same time, the linear velocity at 7x is aproximatelly 35m/sec. To make things clear, this means that 25GB of data can be recorded at 7x in just 14 minutes.

The most suitable writing strategy for 7x recording, according to Philips, should be the so-called "Castle Write Strategy". Hence, for speeds of 1X-2X it will use the improved (n-1) writing strategy and for 4X - 7X the Castle writing strategy just mentioned.


Previous
Next
HP Set to Announce Major Restructuring        All News        NEC Boosts DVD-RAM Recording Speeds with the ND-4550A
CyberLink Releases InterActual Pack for PowerDVD 6     Optical Storage News      NEC Boosts DVD-RAM Recording Speeds with the ND-4550A

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Toshiba's Board Approves $5 billion Injection to Stay Listed
Asus Could Buy Toshiba's PC Business
Toshiba Sells TV, Visual Solutions Unit to Chinese Hisense
Toshiba's Profit Jumps on Strong Memory Demand
Toshiba's Shareholders Approve Sale of Toshiba Memory
New Toshiba TR200 3D NAND SSDs Offer an Affordable Alternative to Hard Disks
Toshiba to Further Invest in Production Equipment for Fab 6 at Yokkaichi Operations
Western Digital Provides Its Aspect on Latest Developments Related to the Sandisk JV with Toshiba
Toshiba Signs Deal to Sell Chip Unit to Bain-led Group
SK Hynix to Invest 395 billion yen in Toshiba chip unit
Western Digital Tries to Block Toshiba's $18 Billion Memory Chip Unit Sale
Toshiba MG06 Series Includes 10TB Enterprise Capacity SATA HDD

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .