Thursday, January 18, 2018
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Apple Accelerates US investment, Plans to Pay $38 billion in Foreign Cash Taxes
Everspin Begins Volume Production of 40nm STT-MRAM
Broadcom is Under Antitrust Investigation by FTC
Google Offers AI Image-Detection Tool to Cloud Customers
New Meizu M6s Comes With Exynos 7872 SoC, New Camera
Surface Book 2 Coming to More Markets
Samsung to Offer Athletes PyeongChang 2018 Olympic Games Limited Edition Smartphone
YouTube Revises Rules to Protect Advertisers From Offensive Content
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > General Computing > Intel D...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, October 10, 2017
Intel Delivers 17-Qubit Superconducting Chip with Advanced Packaging


Intel has delivered a 17-qubit superconducting test chip for quantum computing to QuTech, Intel's quantum research partner in the Netherlands.

The new chip was fabricated by Intel and features a unique design to achieve improved yield and performance.

Quantum computing, in essence, is the ultimate in parallel computing, with the potential to tackle problems conventional computers can't handle. For example, quantum computers may simulate nature to advance research in chemistry, materials science and molecular modeling - like helping to create a new catalyst to sequester carbon dioxide, or create a room temperature superconductor or discover new drugs.

However, despite much experimental progress and speculation, there are inherent challenges to building viable, large-scale quantum systems that produce accurate outputs. Making qubits (the building blocks of quantum computing) uniform and stable is one such obstacle.

Qubits are tremendously fragile: Any noise or unintended observation of them can cause data loss. This fragility requires them to operate at about 20 millikelvin - 250 times colder than deep space. This extreme operating environment makes the packaging of qubits key to their performance and function. Intel's Components Research Group (CR) in Oregon and Assembly Test and Technology Development (ATTD) teams in Arizona are pushing the limits of chip design and packaging technology to address quantum computing's unique challenges.

About the size of a quarter (in a package about the size of a half-dollar coin), the new 17-qubit test chip's improved design features include:

  • New architecture allowing improved reliability, thermal performance and reduced radio frequency (RF) interference between qubits.
  • A scalable interconnect scheme that allows for 10 to 100 times more signals into and out of the chip as compared to wirebonded chips.
  • Advanced processes, materials and designs that enable Intel's packaging to scale for quantum integrated circuits, which are much larger than conventional silicon chips.

Intel's collaborative relationship with QuTech to accelerate advancements in quantum computing began in 2015. Since that time, the collaboration has achieved many milestones - from demonstrating key circuit blocks for an integrated cryogenic-CMOS control system to developing a spin qubit fabrication flow on Intel's 300mm process technology and developing this packaging solution for superconducting qubits

"With this test chip, we'll focus on connecting, controlling and measuring multiple, entangled qubits towards an error correction scheme and a logical qubit," said professor Leo DiCarlo of QuTech. "This work will allow us to uncover new insights in quantum computing that will shape the next stage of development."

Intel and QuTech's work in quantum computing goes beyond the development and testing of superconducting qubit devices. The collaboration spans the entire quantum system - or "stack" - from qubit devices to the hardware and software architecture required to control these devices as well as quantum applications. All of these elements are essential to advancing quantum computing from research to reality.

Intel is also investigating multiple qubit types. These include the superconducting qubits incorporated into this newest test chip, and an alternative type called spin qubits in silicon. These spin qubits resemble a single electron transistor similar in many ways to conventional transistors and potentially able to be manufactured with comparable processes.



Previous
Next
AMD, Intel, ARM, IBM and Others Support the Open Neural Network Exchange Format for AI        All News        Malware Spread Through PornHub
AMD, Intel, ARM, IBM and Others Support the Open Neural Network Exchange Format for AI     General Computing News      Malware Spread Through PornHub

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Google Offers AI Image-Detection Tool to Cloud Customers
Microsoft AI Can Read a Document and Answer Questions About it as Well as a Person
Intel Has to Deal With New Security Issue in Laptops
Intel's New "Ruler" Form Factor Saves Precious Space in Computing Systems
Intel Says Security Patches Can Cause Reboot Problems, AMD Acknowledges Chips Exposed to Spectre
Intel Provides More Performance Data Results for Patched Client Systems
Tsinghua Unigroup May License 3D NAND flash Technology From Intel
CES: Intel Announces the Optane 800P SSD for Consumers
CES: Brian Krzanich Shares New Details on Advances in Autonomous Driving and the Future of Artificial Intelligence
Intel CEO Talks About Security Research Findings at 2018 CES
Micron and Intel to Limit Their NAND Memory Joint Development Program
CES: Intel Launches Most Powerful NUC, 8th Gen Intel Core Processors with Radeon RX Vega M Graphics

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2018 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .