Friday, October 31, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Pirate Bay co-founder 42 Months Imprisonment
SEL Showcases 1058ppi And Foldable OLED Displays
New Outlook for Mac Available Now, Office for Mac Coming In 2015
Updated BBM Offers More Privacy, Control and More
Panasonic Raises Profit Outlook
Toshiba Offers New 4TB and 5TB Desktop HDDs
Samsung Introduces New Ultra Slim Galaxy A5 and Galaxy A3 Smartphones For The Chinese Market
Sharp 2Q Profit Slides
Active Discussions
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Sony De...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, July 20, 2010
Sony Develops Blue-violet Semiconductor Laser With An Output Of 100 Watt


Professor Hiroyuki Yokoyama of the New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University and Advanced Materials Laboratories, Sony, have jointly developed a blue-violet semiconductor laser that could be used in large-capacity optical disc storage and for nano-fabrication.

The new laser features a dramatically improved peak laser beam output level, which is almost 100 times higher than the output provided by the currently available lasers.

The 405 nanometer laser is capable of generating optical pulses with a duration of just 3 picoseconds (1 picosecond = one-trillionth of a second), with an ultrahigh output peak power of 100 watts and a repetition frequency of 1 gigahertz.

To achieve these impressive performance, Tohoku University and Sony have developed a proprietarily GaN-based mode-locked semiconductor laser as well as a new semiconductor optical amplifier. A mode-locked semiconductor laser is a type of semiconductor laser that emits ultrafast optical pulses. It operates by sending optical pulses with an ultrafast duration in the order of picoseconds (or less) back and forth within the laser cavity. A semiconductor optical amplifier is an optical amplifier that can amplify the laser beam directly using a semiconductor. Although the structure is similar to that of a semiconductor laser, the beam-amplifying functionality is enhanced through antireflective fabrication of the laser facets.

Until now, only solid-state lasers could offer such a high outputs. These lasers use solid crystals such as rubies as the laser medium and they were mainly used for leading-edge chemical research applications. However,the light source box of these laser units was bulky and more further engineering was required to ensure the stable operation of the laser.

Sony claims that the new semiconductor laser system could be applied in a wide range of future applications. For instance, this technology enables the size of components such as the light source box to be drastically reduced.

The high-output, ultrafast pulsed semiconductor laser light source is capable of using a nonlinear optical process known as two-photon absorption (TPA), which occurs only as a result of high intensity optical pulses: When a substance interacts with extremely intense light, the substance does not always respond in proportion to the electromagnetic field of the light, thus creating a prismatic effect. TPA is the phenomenon of absorbing two photons simultaneously to excite the eigenstate corresponding to the resulting sum of photon energy. Using this phenomenon to focus light from an intense laser beam on a lens will result in an extremely high density of power in the vicinity of the focus point.

When light from the laser beam is concentrated on the lens, it creates chemical and thermal changes in the vicinity of the lens focus spot which is narrower than even the diameter of the focus spot of the lens itself. It is anticipated that application of these properties will be possible in a wide range of fields such as three-dimensional (3D) nano-fabrication of inorganic/organic materials in the order of nanometers, and next-generation large-capacity optical disc storage.

Sony tested the principles for applying this technology in next-generation large-capacity optical disc-storage by creating void marks with a diameter of approximately 300 nanometers at intervals of 3 micrometers on the interior of plastic material, and successfully read these marks with the laser beam.



Performance characteristics of an experimental blue-violet ultrafast pulsed semiconductor laser

- Laser wavelength: 405 nm (GaN-based semiconductor laser)
- Peak optical output: 100W or more
- Repetition frequency: 1 GHz
- Pulse width: 3 ps


Previous
Next
New Core i5 and i7s Shipping        All News        Nokia Siemens Networks to Acquire Wireless Network Infrastructure Assets of Motorola for USD 1.2 Billion
Plextor PX-B120U External BD-ROM Offers HD and 3D Movie Playback On The Go     Optical Storage News      Sharp Introduces 100GB Blu-ray Disc, BDXL BD Recorders

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
PlayStation 4 Sales Sustain Sony's Quarterly Loss
PS4 Remote Play Now Available for Xperia Z3 Series
Sony To Release Android Lollipop To Its Entire Xperia Xperia Z Series
New Sony Headphones, Portable Headphone DAC/Amplifier and Headphone Cables Support Hi-Resolution Audio
Sony Xperia Z3 Coming To The US
PlayStation TV Coming October 14th
Sony Develops SmartEyeglass, Launches SDK
Sony To Offer Unity For PlayStation To PlayStation Licensed Developers
Sony Slashes Guidance Due To Poor Smartphone Sales
Sony Smart EyeGlass Prototype Appears At IFA
New Sony Camera Shoots In The Dark
Sony Unveils New Xperia Z3, Z3 Compact And More at IFA

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .