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Home > Hardware Reviews > Graphics Cards

Wednesday, May 23, 2007
EVGA 8800GTS KO ACS3

4. F.E.A.R.

The story begins as an unidentified paramilitary force infiltrates a multi-billion dollar aerospace compound. The government responds by sending in Special Forces, but loses contact as an eerie signal interrupts radio communications. When the interference subsides moments later, the team has been literally torn apart. As part of a classified strike team created to deal with threats no one else can handle, your mission is simple: Eliminate the intruders at any cost. Determine the origin of the signal. And contain this crisis before it spirals out of control.

For all tests, we used the latest available patch that updates the gaming engine to v1.08. The game offers 1280x1024 resolution, which was used for all tests. We maxed all details for CPU and VGA card, except for Soft Shadows and AA/AF. We used Nvidia's 3D Control panel to enable AA/AF as indicated in each graph.

Below are the results after using the built-in benchmark test:

F.E.A.R. is a demaning game and the EVGA 8800GTS 640 performed very well. In fact, without enabling anti-aliasing and anistotropic filtering, it is only 1FPS slower than the Gainward 8800GTX! It would be interesting to see how much of an impact enabling AA/AF has:

As was expected, enabling AA/AF gives a performance hit on all tested cards. The EVGA 8800GTS 640MB is very fast, but cannot match the performance of the Gainward 8800GTX.




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