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Appeared on: Wednesday, November 23, 2011
OCZ ZS-750W PSU


1. Features

OCZ recently launched the new ZS series of power supplies, which includes 550W, 650W and 750W varieties. Although designed for those who are on a budget, the ZS series are capable of powering value-oriented gaming systems with both NVIDIA SLI and ATI CrossFireX modes with an array of connectors.

The PSU features only one +12V rail whose maximum power indicates that DC-DC converters are absent from this unit. Each of the PSU's rails is capable of outputting 22A and together they have a combined output of 130W. 12V power is handled via a single rail that is capable of 54A of power for a total of 648W of power. While this isn't the most spectacular output we have seen from a 750W unit, it should be more than sufficient.

Since we have to do with a budget PSU, the ZS750 isn't rated at 100% continuous output at 50C, but rather at a 40C. The ZS750 also lacks Over Power Protection and Over Temperature Protection.

Newegg had the best price for the ZS750 at the time of writing this article, as the unit was listed for $109.99. OCZ backs the ZS series of power supplies with a 3-year warranty.

- Features


2. Opening the package

The ZS750 comes in a simplistic black and blue packaging. On the face of the box we find a photo of the unit on a dark background and right next to it there is a brief characteristics reference. On the rear side we find the same photo along with more details about its features.

The contents of the box are neatly arranged. The PSU is wrapped in plastic and on its bottom there is packing foam. Along with the ZS 750W you will get only only the essentials, namely a user's manual, an AC power cord and a set of fixing bolts:

The dark semi-glossy finish has nice quality, without any sharp edges. On the front the classic honeycomb grill is used along with an On/Off switch. The rear side does not have any ventilation holes and the cable exit is covered by a grommet.

The ZS750 includes an 135 mm fan that draws air into the power supply through the bottom. The fan is generally spinning quietly.

According to OCZ, the The MTBF of the PSU is 100,000 hours, which should be enough for every user.

The PSU has the typical dimensions for the category (150×160×86mm).

The PSU's specs and ratings are illustrated at a sticker found at the side of the device:

The OCZ-ZS750W has one +12V rail that produce an overall 54A resulting a 648Watt max combined load. The single-rail design ensures high voltage but not for anything higher than a dual-graphics card setup. Both 20+4 power and a 4+4 EPS/ATX12V power connectors are present and separated from each other, although we would like to see them bonded together, as most motherboards are designed for such connectors:

Basic parts inside the PSU include a single smoothing capacitor capacitor (390μF, 400V, 85°C) manufactured by Panasonic as well as Japanese made Nippon Chemi-con capacitors.

Below you see the length of each cable included in PSU. We think that the 24 pin ATX cable is could be a little longer. On the other hand, the EPS cable is quite long at 670 mm.

There are four PCIe connectors (two 6+2 pin and two 6 pin) with each one attached in a different length from the remaining cable. Also as you will notice from the table above there are no FDD connectors in this PSU. Finally one company decided to get rid of this scarcely used connector.

The distance among the peripheral and the SATA connectors could be also higher, and the the wires among these connectors are not sleeved:

Connectors Included Length #

ATX 24 pin & 20 pin compatible
47cm x1

EPS/ATX12V 4+4 pin
64cm x1

PCI-E 6 pin
60cm x2

PCI-E 6+2 pin
60cm x2

SATA
62 & 92cm x8

4 pin Peripheral
90cm x4

Floppy
- x0

3. Operation

We should note here that testing a PSU is not very easy and it requires use of specific equipment that would provide information about the current the PSU offers under load, the efficiency of the PSU at average operating levels as well as any power or current limits our PSU might have. Unfortunately, we don't have such a testing equipment in our labs so what we can just do is to use the device and have an idea of its performance using worst case estimations. The specific PSU has been designed to power up to dual graphics cards configurations, so we tried to add enough load to the CPU and graphics systems using a 3D Mark Vantage and PC Mark Vantage. Our test PC was also loaded with the following:

The following table lists the ATX specification for DC voltages (output):

 

After running both benchmarks, the monitored outputs showed us how much stress the PSU has taken. A summary of the results is illustrated below:

Minimum
Maximum
+3.3 V
V
3,23
3,29
+5 V
V
4,89
5.01
+12 V
V
11.86
12,25

Voltage regulation at +12V and 5V is within 3% range and 3.3V are a little higher at 3.6%. Overall voltage regulation is decent for the category of the ZS 750W.


4. Final thoughts

The OCZ ZS-750 Watt is a budget proposal for casual gaming systems. It performed decently during our simple tests, while its operation was silent and stable.

Although it lacks characteristics like modular design, DC-DC converters or Gold efficiency, the OCZ ZS-750 is based on a an older but proven design. Besides the small distance among the SATA and peripheral connectors, the product comes with a minimum 80Plus Bronze certification and balances quality, performance and efficiency.

The OCZ ZS750 does a decent job at voltage regulation for a budget power supply. The unit was able to stay within 3% of specification on both the 5V and 12V rails. This went up a little bit higher on the 3.3V rail . All of the voltages were well within ATX specifications and nothing to be worried about.

Overall, you can find a ZS 750W for about $99, a price that boosts price/performance ratio and renders it a good deal for a mid-range system.

- The Good

- The Bad



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