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Appeared on: Thursday, December 12, 2013
New Broadband Standard Fast-tracks Route to 1Gbit/s Over Copper

ITU has reached first-stage approval of G.fast, the new ITU broadband standard capable of achieving access speeds of up to 1 Gbit/s over existing telephone wires.

Within 250-metre range of a distribution point, G.fast?s fibre-like speeds give service providers a tool to supplement and further monetize fibre to the home (FTTH) strategies with the customer self-installation benefits of ADSL2.

G.fast, within the fibre to the distribution point (FTTdp) architecture, combines the best aspects of fibre and ADSL2. Consumers will have an over-the-counter solution, self-installed without a technician?s assistance, but equipped to support bandwidth-intensive services such as Ultra-HD '4K' or '8K' streaming and IPTV, advanced cloud-based storage, and communication via HD video.

The physical-layer protocol aspects of G.fast have reached the point of stability required to initiate the standard's approval procedure. Chip manufacturers will now scale-up G.fast chip design and testing efforts, feeding results of this work into ITU-T Study Group 15 in the interests of finalizing G.fast as early as April 2014.

G.fast is designed to coexist with VDSL2, enabling service providers to play to the strengths of each standard in different environments.

The technology increases the bandwidth by using more spectrum. G.fast will use the 106MHz of spectrum, which compares to the 17MHz or 30MHz used by VDSL2 and the 40MHz used by the fastest LTE-Advanced networks currently being tested.

The drawback with G.fast is that it will only work over short distances, so 1Gbps will only be possible at distances of up to about 100 meters. The technology is being designed to work at distances up to 250 meters, though transmission speed is slower at that distace.

In order to cope with crosstalk interference, G.fast uses a technology called vectoring. It works by continuously analyzing the noise conditions on copper lines, and then creates a new, antinoise signal to cancel it out.




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