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Thursday, July 19, 2001
 Fungus, Sulfur attack CDs
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Message Text: "...The U.K.'s Daily Telegraph, and later, Nature reported the discovery by Spanish scientists of a fungus in Belize that ate through portions of a CD's aluminum reflective layer. Biologists at the Superior Council for Scientific Research in Madrid identified the fungus as belonging to the common geotrichum genus. Nature stated that the fungus usually feeds on plants and animals, occasionally infecting the human respiratory system. The Telegraph quoted Council scientist Victor Cardenes as saying, "It completely destroys the aluminum. It leaves nothing behind."

Cardenes told the Telegraph that while visiting the small Central American nation Belize, some friends showed him a CD from their collection that had become unplayable and transparent in areas. The fungus is believed to have entered the disc in question through the outer edge. CD co-inventor Philips commented to the British newspaper that the incident was most likely a "freak accident caused by extreme weather conditions." "The symptoms of the corrosion are obvious," Howard continues. "Audibly it manifests first towards the end of the disc (i.e., the outer edge) and sounds not unlike rhythmic LP surface noise. Visibly it manifests as a coppery-bronze discoloration, usually on the edge of the label side of the disc."..."

 
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