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Friday, July 27, 2012
 Nvidia Tegra To Support Wireless Display
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Message Text: Nvidia will bring wireless display to its Tegra chips, which will allow mobile devices based on the chips to beam images and audio directly to high-definition TVs.

The Wi-Fi Allicance will soon introduce their Miracast wireless display standard - enabling mobile devices to stream video and audio directly to large HDTVs without the need for cables or an existing wireless network.

Miracast wireless display will be an open standard, so any mobile device or display manufacturer can implement the technology. That means any Miracast-certified device can instantly stream to any Miracast-enabled display.

NVIDIA, as a member of the Wi-Fi Alliance, will bring Tegra's multimedia capabilities to wireless displays.

"We're not just talking about flinging Angry Birds but racing a super-charged jet ski in the game Riptide THD and playing heart-pounding first-person shooter games like Shadowgun THD, wrote Mike Han, senior product manager for Tegra at Nvidia, in a blog entry. "You can even take mobile gaming to the next level by pairing a Tegra device with a console controller for the ultimate wireless display experience."

Nvidia is working with its OEM partners and Miracast receiver vendors to bring this technology to market.

Other Miracast standard supporters include Qualcomm and Texas Instruments.

Intel also offers the competing Wi-Di (Wireless Display) technology, which also uses Wi-Fi to transmit images wirelessly from PCs to TV sets. PCs with Wi-Di chipsets send images and audio wirelessly to TV sets connected to Wi-Di set-top boxes. The Wi-Di technology has been criticized for the latency in receiving the signals for playback on TV, which for example could reflect in lag time in mouse movement. Intel has said Wi-Di is improving, and the chip maker hopes to bring the technology to mobile devices.
 
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