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Wednesday, May 16, 2012
 NEC Develops Gesture Controlling Technology
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Message Text: NEC has developed an interactive technology that allows the control of information through a combination of user gestures and the display of images from a projector.

The newly-developed technology is controlled through the combination of a movable camera, which measures and recognises three-dimensional shapes, and a compact image projector. In addition to enabling the gesture-based control of information between devices, without the use of an input device such as a remote control or mouse, images that facilitate input, such as a keyboard image, can be flexibly displayed in a wide range of locations. NEC claims that this results in natural interactions that are intuitive and allow users to easily see the effect of their actions.

A camera that measures three-dimensional shapes is used to recognise the movement and shape of the hands and fingers as control input. This means that tasks such as the movement of data between terminals and the control of devices can be performed without the use of an input device such as a remote control, mouse or keyboard. Further, images from the compact image projector that facilitate input, such as a keyboard or selected photo, can be projected onto a variety of surfaces such as a desk or a user's hand, achieving natural interaction where the results of operations are readily understood.

The movable measurement camera and projector are controlled in an integrated fashion. As a result, high-precision input and images can be projected while tracking a user's gesture-based movements over a wide range. Additionally, the locations of multiple distant devices can be specified to enable control.

Using this technology, multiple devices can be controlled based on a user's movements, without the use of an input device, producing interfaces that boast more natural interaction. Looking ahead, NEC will also develop a range of applied technologies, such as the free gesture-based control of digital signage, and the operation of lights, air conditioners and other devices not equipped with displays.
 
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