Friday, August 22, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
German Regulator Will Pursue Complaint Against Publishers
IBM Tries To Strengthen Its Presence In China With Local Vendor Deal
Demand For iPhone 6 Screens Add Perssure To Supply Chain
Intel Highlights Its Wireless Computing Plans
Ouya Parners With Xiaomi On Games
Sony Offers New Smart Tennis Sensor
Microsoft to Announce Windows 9 on September Event: report
Acer Unveils New Chromebox CXI and Chromebook 11
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Philips...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, May 19, 2004
Philips says flexible thin TV is not far


Researchers at Philips said they had achieved breakthroughs in display technologies which in a few years time can be used to build much thinner TVs for a fraction of today's cost.

The Dutch electronics company, which also manufactures hospital equipment, chips and shavers, showed journalists this week how it has advanced with efforts to build flat and flexible displays from plastics and other new materials.

The new technologies and production methods are aimed to replace today's cutting edge Liquid Crystal Displays (LCD) and Plasma-based displays which are becoming increasingly popular with consumers as they replace computer monitors and TVs.

Electronics firms are investing billion of dollars in LCD production lines every year to boost capacity -- Philips itself is one of the world's biggest producers together with South Korea's LG Electronics.

The Dutch firm unveiled a 13-inch widescreen display made of PolyLED, which is Philips' own version of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs). Philips hopes PolyLED displays will eventually be easier and cheaper to produce than OLED displays.

Philips said it will show prototypes at the annual SID displays conference in Seattle next week.

At the same show, U.S.-based IBM and Taiwan's display maker Chi Mei Optoelectronics will present a 20-inch OLED display developed by a joint research group, which is considered by industry pundits as another breakthrough at the show.

Philips reckons the new technology has the potential to be much cheaper than existing flat panels, because the light emitting material, which emits light when turned on with a current, can be printed on a surface much like office printers deposit millions of tiny drops of ink on paper.

The prototype display is printed on glass, in order to keep the material in place, but the company is looking hard to find alternative, flexible materials that will do the same.

The first full color PolyLED displays are "close to the market", while the first would be used as external displays on fold-away mobile phones. PolyLED screens for the bigger internal displays are on the roadmap for 2005.

Between 2006 and 2008 Philips expects full color PolyLED screens to pop up in portable DVD players and car seats to entertain children. Big screen TVs are expected by 2009.

PolyLed and OLED screens can be much thinner. Unlike an LCD or plasma screen, which are based on color filtering, they do not require a backlight. Instead the red, green and yellow materials themselves emit light.

PolyLED and OLED displays are more energy-efficient than LCDs, because they only emit light when needed, as opposed to the backlight of an LCD display which is always on.

Additional benefits are much higher contrast and OLED screens have a much wider viewing angle compared with LCD.

One remaining hurdle is the lifespan of the blue color polymer Olds. It is not yet long enough to build TVs that will have to function for many thousands of hours, although the lifespan has already been trebled in just the last six months.

The prototype PolyLED display will last only 1,000 hours.

Philips will also show a new LCD manufacturing technology, which allows printing on flexible surfaces like plastic, after having improved a technology that was announced two years ago. It will initially be used to show simple, static pictures.


Previous
Next
Plasmon partners with Pegasus to demonstrate Veritas DLM solution        All News        Samsung says PC memory shortage to continue
Plasmon partners with Pegasus to demonstrate Veritas DLM solution     Optical Storage News      Samsung says PC memory shortage to continue

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Philips to Create New Lumileds and Automotive Lighting Businesses Company
Philips and Salesforce.com To Deliver Cloud-based Healthcare Information Technology
EU To Fine Philips, Infineon And Samsung
Philips to Sell WOOX Innovations to Gibson
Philips Announces Its 2014 TV Lineup
MWC: Philips and Ericsson Unite On Smart Street Lighting
Philips Lighting System Guides You Through The Supermarket
Philips to transfer Remaining Stake in TV Joint Venture to TPV
Philips At CES 2014
Philips Celebrates 100 Years of Research
EU Raids Samung, Philips In Antitrust Probe
Funai Sues Philips For Breach of Contract

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .