Friday, August 01, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
French Carrier Iliad To Bid For T-Mobile
Google's Ambitious Secret Barge Project Was Scarped
Chinese Smartphones Boost Sharp's 1Q Operating Profit
HP's Luxury Smartwatch Coming This Fall
Tessera and Micron Execute New Technology and Patent License Agreements
Sony Releases The AS20 Action Cam, New Cyber-shots
Microsoft Releases New Limited Edition Wireless Mobile Mouse 3500 With Master Chief from Halo
Researchers Discover New Smartphone Flaws
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Don Joh...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, January 28, 2004
Don Johansen asks compensation in acquittal


A Norwegian man who became a hacker hero for cracking security codes on Hollywood DVDs wants police to compensate him now that he's been acquitted twice of computer piracy, his lawyer said Tuesday.

Jon Lech Johansen, 20, also known as DVD Jon, was 15 when he developed a program to watch movies on a Linux-based computer without DVD-viewing software. He posted the codes on the Internet in 1999 and became a folk hero among computer hackers.

Norway's economic crime police charged him under data break-in laws, demanding a suspended jail sentence, confiscation of equipment and fines.

However, Norwegian courts twice ruled that Johansen could not be convicted of breaking into DVDs he bought legally, nor could he be punished for providing a tool - such as a computer program - that others might use for illegal acts.

The Oslo District Court acquitted Johansen just more than a year ago. Police appealed to the Borgarting appeals court in Oslo, and last month lost that case as well.

Johansen's lawyer, Halvor Manshaus, said his client will seek about $21,800 from the economic crime police because the case had been such a burden over the past four years.

Johansen had been charged after police received a complaint from the Motion Picture Association of America and the DVD Copy Control Association, which licenses the film industry's Content Scrambling System, or CSS.

This month, prosecutor Inge Marie Sunde unexpectedly declined to appeal to the supreme court. Many, including Johansen, had expected a high court appeal because the case was the first of its kind in Norway.

Johansen's program, called DeCSS, is one of many that can break the CSS.


Previous
Next
EU to decide against Microsoft        All News        EU to decide against Microsoft
EU to decide against Microsoft     Optical Storage News      EU to decide against Microsoft

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA
France Drops Three-strikes Law
Australian Police Sized 80,000 Counterfeit DVDs
Web Piracy Does Not Affect Music Sales, Study Says
France Proposes Tougher Anti-Piracy Laws
Illegal P2P Music Downloads Dropped in 2012

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .