Monday, April 21, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Sharp Improves LCD Viewing Angle With New Optical Film
Ex-Apple CEO To Sell Mobiles In India
HTC Hired Ex-Samsung Marketing Officer
Xbox One Wolrdwide Sales Cross 5 million
Samsung Works With GLOBALFOUNDRIES On 14 nm FinFET Offering
Facebook To Find Nearby Friends
Console Sales Lift AMD's First Quarter Results
LG Expands 'Second Screen' TV Ecosystem With Open-Source SDK
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > Optical Storage > EVD: Th...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Saturday, January 24, 2004
EVD: The Asian answer to royalty fees


Separate consortia in Taiwan and China are pecking away at a new DVD format that would enable disc and player manufacturers to evade royalty payments to Japanese, American and European companies, which now have a lock on the technology.

More than a year ago, China said it was developing a format called Advanced Versatile Disc (AVD) that would be used only in the Greater China region, including Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau. Some considered it bluster, a ploy by Chinese manufacturers to strike a better deal on royalty payments to the DVD Forum. But the establishment of a Taiwanese consortium now adds greater substance to the threat.

After several months of exploring the feasibility of AVD, 19 Taiwanese companies quietly came together in April 2002 to start work on a next-generation standard that would not use the format specified by the DVD Forum as a base- line technology.

The Taiwan standard is being called Enhanced Versatile Disc (EVD) and is basically compatible with China’s AVD. The capacity potential is about 1 Byte higher than that of today’s single-sided, one- and two-layer DVDs. Current red-laser technology will be implemented.

The consensus here is that with the help of Taiwan, China will attempt to repeat an earlier effort in which it developed Super Video CD (SVCD) as a foil to the Video CD format, allowing manufacturers to duck royalty payments to Philips, JVC, Sony and Matsushita.

Although China represents a small share of DVD player sales, it is growing in prominence.

Increasing pressure to pay royalties, combined with falling DVD player prices, has intensified efforts to develop China’s own standard.

The DVD6C licensing group, composed of Hitachi, Matsushita, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, JVC and AOL Time Warner, earlier this month laid out a plan to woo domestic Chinese manufacturers to the group’s royalty scheme of up to $4 per unit. The 6C group offered royalty-free sales through Dec. 31 of last year to units built for the domestic Chinese market. The waiver is available only to manufacturers that sign a license before June 30, 2002. There is still no word on whether Chinese manufacturers will buy into the plan.

Separately, the so-called 3C group — consisting of Philips, Sony and Pioneer — is also demanding that Chinese manufacturers begin paying royalties on DVD players. Any party that makes, uses, imports or sells products covered by the licensed patents is expected to contact both the 6C and 3C groups and pay them separate fees. Furthermore, because the DVD format uses the MPEG-2 video standard, another separate royalty must be paid to MPEG LA, the MPEG licensing authority.

All the assorted payments add up to $15 to $20 per unit. Besides MPEG, 6C and 3C, they include payments for Dolby sound and to owners of various copy protection systems. Most Chinese manufacturers have refused to pay, just as they refused to pay Video CD royalties.

Though details are still sketchy, many industry sources suggested that the new format will offer the Chinese domestic market high-resolution video — some say high definition (HD), others say full D1 video using red-laser technology — in time for the 2008 Olympics in China.

Several industry sources confirmed that emerging EVD or AVD players will be capable of playing back both EVD / AVD discs and DVD discs. Given that DVD is already a huge success on the global market, an attempt to develop a new format player that does not play DVD discs is suicidal.

The next question is whether DVD-format license holders can go after Chinese OEMs for royalties on products labeled as EVD or AVD players. The question here is whether a proprietary product that plays both EVD/ AVD and DVD discs can be considered, technically, not a DVD player. The distinction is crucial to many that hold essential DVD-format patents.


Previous
Next
Italian court rules mod chips legal        All News        Italian court rules mod chips legal
Italian court rules mod chips legal     Optical Storage News      Italian court rules mod chips legal

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Sprint BlackBerry Pearl is Official
Sprint BlackBerry 8830 World Phone is Available
Chinese Firms Seek to Replace DVDs with Home-grown Technology
NME Strengthens Ties With Plasmon to Promote VMD
NME Launches 1920/1080 High Definition Red Laser Players at CeBIT
NME and Beijing E-World Technology Co., Ltd To Launch Total Red Laser HD Solution
Taiwan To Cooperate with China on High Definition Format
China Approves Own Audio-video Coding Standard
Microsoft to Support Taiwanese FVD Project for HD Video
China adopts EVD as national DVD standard
Shinco shifts from DVD players to EVD players
China market: Shinco shifts from DVD players to EVD players

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .