Sunday, December 21, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Samsung Introduces SE790C Curved Monitor
Chinese Motion-sensing VR Glasses Coming On Kickstarter
Kodak Returns To CES With Consumer Product Line
North Korea Suggests Joint Inverstigation With U.S. Over Sony Hacking
T-Mobile to Pay $90 Million To Settle Case With FCC
New Trojan Targetted Banks Wordlwide
FBI Confirms North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack
Apple Responds To BBC's Allegations Over Working Conditions In Chinese Factory
Active Discussions
Digital Audio Extraction and Plextools
Will there be any trade in scheme for the coming PSP Go?
Hello, Glad to be Aboard!!!
Best optical drive for ripping CD's? My LG 4163B is mediocre.
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Intel d...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Friday, November 28, 2003
Intel demonstrates next-generation process technology


Intel Corporation has built fully functional SRAM (Static Random Access Memory) chips using 65 nanometre (nm) technology, its next generation high-volume semiconductor manufacturing process. Intel is on track to put this process into production in 2005 using 300mm wafers.

This new 65nm (a nanometre is one-billionth of a meter) process combines higher-performance and lower-power transistors, a second-generation version of Intel's strained silicon, high-speed copper interconnects and a low-k dielectric material. Building chips using the 65nm process will allow Intel to double the number of transistors it can build on a single chip today.

Advanced transistors: Intel's new 65nm process will feature transistors measuring only 35nm in gate length, which will be the smallest and highest performing CMOS transistors in high-volume production. By comparison, the most advanced transistors in production today, found in Intel Pentium 4 processors, measure 50nm. Small, fast transistors are the building blocks for very fast processors.

Strained silicon: Intel has integrated a second-generation version of its high-performance strained silicon into this process. Strained silicon provides higher drive current, increasing the speed of the transistors with only a 2% increase in manufacturing cost.

Copper interconnects with new low-k dielectric: The process integrates eight copper interconnect layers and uses a ”low-k” dielectric material that increases the signal speed inside the chip and reduces chip power consumption.

Intel has used its 65nm process to make fully functional, four-megabit SRAM chips with a very small 0.57µm cell size. Small SRAM cells allow for the integration of larger caches in processors, which increase performance. The SRAM cells have robust operating characteristics, with a solid noise margin indicating very efficient on/off switching properties. Each SRAM memory cell has six transistors: 10 million of these transistors would fit in one square millimetre, roughly the size of the tip of a ballpoint pen.

“Intel's 65nm process development is progressing well and we are producing these wafers and chips in our development fab,” said Mark Bohr, Intel Senior Fellow and director of process architecture and integration. “By 2005, we expect to be the first company to have a 65nm process in manufacturing.”

The 65nm semiconductor devices were manufactured at Intel's 300 mm development fab (called D1D) in Hillsboro, Oregon, where the process was developed. D1D is Intel's newest fab and contains its largest individual cleanroom measuring 176 000 square feet, which is roughly the size of three-and-a-half football fields.

More information can be found in Intel's Silicon Showcase at www.intel.com/research/silicon.


Previous
Next
Sony to make SCE wholly owned subsidiary        All News        Sony to make SCE wholly owned subsidiary
Sony to make SCE wholly owned subsidiary     Optical Storage News      Sony to make SCE wholly owned subsidiary

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Intel, IBM Follow Different Strategies On 14nm FinFET
Intel Unifies and Simplifies Connectivity for IoT
TSMC To Make Intel's SoFIA Handset Chips
Intel to Invest in China Factory
Intel and Luxottica To Collaborate On Smart Eyewear
Intel Offers Professor Stephen Hawking Ability to Better Communicate
Intel Acquires Security Firm PasswordBox
Intel To Release Chromecast-like Thumb-sized PCs
Intel Gives Upbeat Outlook for 2015 Revenue
Intel Labs Showcase Low-energy DRAM Memory
Intel to Merge Mobile Business With PC Division
Intel Light Beams to Speed Up Supercomputers, Details New Intel Xeon Phi, MICA Smart Bracelet

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .