Tuesday, September 01, 2015
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
NVIDIA GRID 2.0 Launches
New LG Luxurious Urbane Smartwatch To Appear at IFA
Alienware Brings Liquid Cooling and Dynamic Overclocking to Holiday Lineup
Razer Launches Wildcat Xbox One Controller And Upgraded Nabu Smartband
Workstation Market Shippments Rebound In Q2
Google Will Help You Find Your Plumber
IFA 2015: What We Know So Far
Acer Liquid Z410 And Liquid Jade Z Phones Released
Active Discussions
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
How to burn a backup copy of The Frozen Throne
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
 Home > News > Optical Storage > 52 pira...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, September 30, 2003
52 piracy suits settled


The RIAA said it has reached out-of-court settlements with 52 people who were sued for sharing online music illegally and 12 others who were targeted for possible legal action.

The announcement was among a flurry of developments over online file sharing. A U.S. Senate subcommittee will begin a hearing today on the recording industry's decision to employ U.S. copyright law to sue individuals who use online file-sharing programs like Kazaa.

Meanwhile, a new survey indicated that Kazaa usage has dropped 41 percent since June. Finally, the American Civil Liberties Union asked a federal judge to protect the identity of a Boston College student being probed by the RIAA.

An estimated 60 million Americans have used programs like Kazaa to download music for free, a practice that the RIAA contends has helped drastically undercut CD sales, by 31 percent, in the last three years.

The RIAA, the Washington, D.C., trade group that represents the world's biggest record labels, said it has reached settlements with 52 of the 261 people the group sued on Sept. 8 for illegally offering an average of 1,000 songs each for others to download via the Internet.

The RIAA has dismissed one suit against a Massachusetts grandmother who claimed she was wrongly accused, although the trade group left open the possibility of refiling.

In addition, the RIAA said it had reached settlements with 12 people who had not yet been sued but were under an RIAA investigation for offering "significant amounts of music files.'' The RIAA had obtained the names of those individuals by issuing subpoenas to their Internet service providers.

Terms of the settlements and the names of the defendants were not disclosed, although the RIAA has received $2,000 to $17,000 in past copyright infringement settlements.

According to a copy of a proposed agreement released by the RIAA, defendants must agree to "not make any public statements that are inconsistent'' with the terms of the settlement. They also must destroy any files and burned CDs made with illegally downloaded songs.

The RIAA said an additional 861 people had signed affidavits in which they voluntarily admitted they were illegal file sharers and promised to stop. The signings are part of a RIAA amnesty program called "Clean Slate.'' However, such critics as San Francisco's digital civil rights group Electronic Frontier Foundation contend that the program is what it calls a "trick'' that offers no protection against suits by individual record labels.

Cindy Cohn, the organization's legal director, said the RIAA was using settlements against a small handful of people to "terrorize" millions of other file sharers. "I just know I wouldn't crow about taking the life savings of single mothers and college students and grandparents,'' she said. "Is that really the answer?''

Today in Washington, a U.S. Senate subcommittee will convene a hearing questioning the RIAA's lawsuit strategy. The Senate's Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, chaired by Sen. Norm Coleman, R-Minn., will hear from three panels of speakers, including new RIAA Chairman Mitch Bainwol and rap star LL Cool J.


Previous
Next
DELL OFFERS CUSTOMERS THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE SERIAL ATA HARD DRIVE ON THE PLANET – Western Digital’s WD RAPTOR™        All News        DELL OFFERS CUSTOMERS THE HIGHEST PERFORMANCE SERIAL ATA HARD DRIVE ON THE PLANET – Western Digital’s WD RAPTOR™
Code Blue featured at Optical Storage Symposium - 2003     Optical Storage News      Code Blue featured at Optical Storage Symposium - 2003

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
RIAA Says U.S. Music Business Remained Relatively Flat in 2014
U.S. Trade Office Releases Latest Notorious Markets List
Pirate Bay Back Online
Pirate Bay Co-founder Sentenced To 42 Months Imprisonment
Search Engines Play A role In Piracy: study
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2015 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .