Saturday, December 03, 2016
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Apple Sent Letter NHTSA Asking About Autonomous Vehicle Guidelines
Apple Blames Battery For Random iPhone 6s Shutdowns
Microsoft Stores Reveal Xbox Discounts And Offers
Researcher Bypasses The iOS Activation Lock
Facebook To Offer $20 million To Improve Silicon Valley Communities
Xiaomi Launches Voice -controller Mi Wi-Fi Speaker
Xiaomi "Denies" Mi MIX Nano Existence
Nokia D1C Specs Leak
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Shatter...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, October 09, 2002
Shattered: This CD's in tatters?


If you hear an intense vibrating noise or a bang from your superfast 48X CD-ROM or CD-RW drive, beware: Your disc may be shattering.

Robert Resovich, application engineering manager at drive maker Plextor, says that a CD's generally vulnerable inner ring becomes more so when the disc is spun in the newest drives (currently the standard is 48X/24X/48X). "You get upwards of 10,000 rpm, and at the outer edge, that's roughly the equivalent of 150 miles an hour," he explains. "At that speed, things can come apart."

User Ricardo Kustner discovered that the problem may occur even with slower drives. When he put a Microsoft Windows NT 4 installation CD with a tiny crack into his 24X CD-ROM drive, "it started to make a spinning noise, and then suddenly a loud crack." When he opened the drive, the disc had shattered.

The threat isn't dire: Esteban Kim, marketing manager at CD-ROM and CD-RW drive manufacturer Lite-On, notes that drives capable of reading at 48X and 52X have only a 0.01 to 0.02 percent risk of causing a disc to shatter--the equivalent of 1 to 2 discs for every 10,000.

Resovich says discs must suffer from a serious defect to shatter. Examples include brittleness caused by repeatedly snapping discs in and out of cases or drives in portable players or laptops, and imperfect balance, perhaps from an off-center or wrinkled label.

CD-ROM vendors such as Plextor are trying to improve disc balancing techniques and to build stronger drives. Still, the next time you pop a CD into a drive, be sure to look for abnormalities that could cause the disc to splinter.


Previous
Next
Dat Optic announces ComboDUP- stand alone CD/DVD duplicator        All News        Dat Optic announces ComboDUP- stand alone CD/DVD duplicator
Dat Optic announces ComboDUP- stand alone CD/DVD duplicator     Optical Storage News      Dat Optic announces ComboDUP- stand alone CD/DVD duplicator

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Panasonic Develops IPS Liquid Crystal Panel with Contrast Ratio Of Over 1,000,000:1
U.S. To Develop Safety Guidelines For Self-driving Cars
CDs Remain Popular In Japan
Ford Tripling Autonomous Vehicle Development Fleet
Ford And Google In Talks To Build Self-driving Cars: report
California Wants A Man Behind The Wheel Of Self-driving Cars
Memory-Tech Promises Improved Audio CD Quality With New UHQCD Technology
Acer Launches Gaming Monitor Enabled by AMD FreeSync Technology
Microsoft Outlines Basic Elements Of Direct3D 12
CD-R And CD-RW Discs Represent $368 Million in 2013 - CD writers and CD Combo Disappearing
New SDXC And SDHC Memory Cards Support 4K2K Video
LCD TV Panel Shipments Dip in Q3 For The First Time

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2016 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .