Wednesday, October 01, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Microsoft Previews Windows 10
Google Offers Unlimited Cloud Storage To Students
Gionee Announced The World's Thinnest Smartphone
MPEG LA Rolls Out HEVC License
PayPal To Become An Independent Publicly Traded Company in 2015
AMD To Showcase ARM Cortex-A57-Based Hadoop on Opteron Processors
SanDisk Introduces New X300 SSD And Client SSD Upgrade Service For Corporate Environments
TSMC and ARM Announce 16nm FinFET Silicon with 64-bit ARM big.LITTLE Technology
Active Discussions
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Court r...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, September 23, 2002
Court rules that Nichia, not inventor, owns blue LED patent


The key patent for gallium nitride-based blue LEDs and laser diodes belongs to Nichia Corp., the Tokyo District Court ruled Thursday (Sept. 19), rejecting a claim by Shuji Nakamura, who invented the technology while working for Nichia. Nakamura, now a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, filed a lawsuit against Nichia in August 2001 seeking ownership of the patent for two-flow MOCVD technology, which covers a key aspect of blue LED production. Nakamura also sought monetary compensation for his development of the GaN devices.

The two-flow MOCVD technology differentiates Nichia's GaN-based optical devices from those of competitors. Conceived in 1991, the two-flow MOCVD technology enabled the creation of high-quality GaN layers which led to bright diodes with higher power and longer lives than competing devices. The technology was registered in Japan as patent No. 2628404 under Nichia Corp.'s name, and is commonly known as the 404 patent.

Nakamura's lawsuit attracted industrywide interest because it raised questions about the ownership of inventions by individual engineers and researchers while employed by a company, and also raised the sensitive issue of workers in Japan not being adequately compensated for their developments. The case led many companies to review their systems of compensating workers for patent development.

The Tokyo court on Thursday ruled that Nakamura and Nichia had a tacit contract under which Nakamura gave the ownership of his invention to Nichia. The court said, however, that patent law indicates Nakamura is eligible for certain rewards for his achievements.

Nakamura expressed dissatisfaction with the ruling and said he will appeal the case. Hidetoshi Masunaga, a lawyer representing Nakamura, said he believes the ruling will be reversed by a higher court.

The Tokyo District Court must still rule on the monetary compensation due Nakamura for his development. Nakamura had claimed that the court could reject his claim for patent ownership but still find that Nichia owed him about $17 million for his invention.

Nichia welcomed the ruling, and said it will continue to confront Nakamura in court. "Though we are no longer using the 404 patent technology," a Nichia spokesman said.


Previous
Next
CMC to raise CD-R prices by 5-10% in December        All News        CMC to raise CD-R prices by 5-10% in December
CMC to raise CD-R prices by 5-10% in December     Optical Storage News      CMC to raise CD-R prices by 5-10% in December

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Nichia Starts Sample Shipments of Green Laser
Sharp and Nichia Enter into LED and Laser Diode Patent Cross-Licensing Agreement
Nichia Starts Engineering Sample Shipments of 488nm Blue-green Semiconductor Laser
New Laser Diode Supports 12x Blu-Ray/HD DVD Recording
Nichia and Moeller settled for Blue LED patents
Nichia settles "amicably" with US retailer
"No regrets" says disappointed Nakamura
Nichia and Nakamura settle for only $8m
Nichia and SONY Co-Develop New Dual Wavelength LASER Coupler Device Compatible With Red and Blue-Violet LASERs
Nichia to supply lasers to disk rivals
Nichia-Sony cross license agreement on Blue-Violet Laser diode related patents for optical disc
Nichia Corporation got The Nikkei BP Technology Prize

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .