Friday, December 19, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
T-Mobile to Pay $90 Million To Settle Case With FCC
New Trojan Targetted Banks Wordlwide
FBI Confirms North Korea Was Behind Sony Hack
Apple Responds To BBC's Allegations Over Working Conditions In Chinese Factory
BlackBerry Returns To Cash Flow
Comparison: Quantum Dot Vs. OLED Displays
Toshiba and SK Hynix Reach Settlement in Lawsuit Ahead Of CES
Google Concerned About MPAA's Actions To Revive SOPA
Active Discussions
Digital Audio Extraction and Plextools
Will there be any trade in scheme for the coming PSP Go?
Hello, Glad to be Aboard!!!
Best optical drive for ripping CD's? My LG 4163B is mediocre.
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Major m...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, September 02, 2002
Major music labels promote new CD format


Consumers will soon see a new digital music format in their local stores. Called DataPlay digital media, these news discs are smaller than CDs and represent the music industry's latest attempt to distribute music in a copy-protected format.

While this new media is physically small, it is supported by large industry forces. Three of the top five record companies -- Universal Music, EMI Group and BMG -- have already signed on. The list of artists expected to re-release successful albums in the DataPlay format includes Carlos Santana, 'N Sync, Britney Spears, Sarah McLachlan and Pink.

The discs themselves are contained in a transparent plastic shell, and are small enough to fit in the palm of a hand. Consumers will be able to buy blank, recordable DataPlay discs as well as prerecorded, copy-protected discs.

The Big Promotion

Competing against CDs is a formidable challenge -- recent reports estimate that there are 1.5 billion CD players. But DataPlay has features that might allow it to gain a toehold.

These include games and extensive photo galleries, music videos (for which the player must be connected to a PC) and artist interviews. Next generation DataPlay players might be equipped with video screens.

Additionally, both the media and its player are so small -- though still offering CD-quality sound -- that they can be easily transported. And users can download music from the Internet and burn it onto DataPlay discs.

Tough Road

The cost of DataPlay media is causing skepticism among music industry observers. Blank media costs US$5 per disc when purchased as part of a 10-pack. In contrast, traditional CD media costs less then 50 cents per disc and has 150 megabytes more storage capacity. An album released on DataPlay will retail in the $18 to $22 range.

The DataPlay player-burner units are also more expensive than traditional CD recorders. The only player-burner currently available, the iDP-100 by iRiver America, costs $350.

Chance for Survival

Yankee Group media and entertainment analyst Ryan Jones told NewsFactor that the DataPlay format "is going to meet considerable struggle in the marketplace." He said the music industry thought that DataPlay's major label support would give it a decisive edge, but support of this kind is not enough.

Equally important is support from major electronics manufacturers, which DataPlay does not yet have. "Every major media transition in the past 20 years -- it's been Sony and Philips that have done it every time," Jones said, noting that start-ups like DataPlay cannot achieve the momentum of those two giants.

But, he pointed out, "consumer electronics manufacturers will be under increasing pressure to integrate some kind of copy protection into their devices." And DataPlay might be the solution they adopt -- unless Sony and Philips choose one of their own proprietary solutions.

The Future

Further complicating matters is the fact that there is a great deal of competition for shelf space in the media market right now.

"DataPlay is coming on the market at a time when retailers are scratching their heads about whether they should stock CDs, SACDs, DVD-Audio, VHS, DVD -- and the minidisc is still around," said Jones.

As the major labels continue to try to develop a copy-protected format, there will likely be a widespread movement away from the CD format. But until the large manufacturers agree on which new format to promote, the future of media and media players will remain unclear.


Previous
Next
DVD maker says Hollywood will decide format war...        All News        DVD maker says Hollywood will decide format war...
DVD maker says Hollywood will decide format war...     Optical Storage News      DVD maker says Hollywood will decide format war...

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
DataPlay Becomes DaTARIUS Again
AudioDev and DaTARIUS Enter Strategic Cooperation
DataPlay Acquires DaTARIUS Technology
LG, DataPlay compete for technical lead in compact optical discs
CD replacement burns out
Santana, Whitney Houston and Avril Lavigne to release albums on DataPlay
Where is DataPlay?
FIRST DATAPLAY-ENABLED DIGITAL CAMERA UNVEILED
Evolution Technologies and MTV unveil the "MTV DataPlay" music player at CES
New recording format to challenge music CDs
InterTrust and DataPlay announce partnership for protecting portable media
Imation to ship DataPlay's tiny discs first

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .