Monday, October 20, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Strong iPhone, Mac And App Store Sales Drive Apple's Record September Quarter Revenue And Earnings
Apple iOS 8.1 Available For Download
E FUN To Relase $179 Windows tablet
Microsoft And Dell Puts Azure In A Box
TDK Brings Wireless Charging To Electric Cars
Intel To Work With AT&T To Research Software Defined Networking
Intel Meegopad T01 Is A Bay Trail PC On HDMI Stick
Biostar Relases New iDEQ-T1 Compact Desktop
Active Discussions
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Record ...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, May 30, 2002
Record companies look for answers as CD burning, file-swapping threaten industry


A new technology lets people copy music for free. Lawsuits are filed. Music sales dip. The viability of the recording industry is in doubt. The technology? Not the CD burning and Internet file-sharing that's currently revolutionizing the way people listen to music. No, it was the cassette tape that had record companies worried about their future when it gained popularity more than three decades ago.

"This was heralded by the record industry as doom," said Stan Cornyn, a longtime Warner Bros. executive and author of the new book "Exploding," about Warner Music Group.

But predictions of the end of the music industry didn't pan out: New musical styles and the new technology of the compact disc allowed it to flourish. And many record executives look to that time in hopes they can respond creatively to overcome the current crisis.

"What cures business at a time like this is innovation — thinking what the customer wants, giving the customer what they will buy — and I don't feel a lot of that is going on right now," Cornyn said. "(But) record companies will come around to redefining themselves. They've done that again and again through history."

The labels have taken some steps to reposition, even reinvent themselves. They're putting music online themselves, offering rebates and experimenting with new ways of promoting artists. (They're also filing lawsuits, trying to exert pressure on technology manufacturers and floating copy-proof CDs.)

They argue that their role as filters and promoters will be ever more important as the universe of online music expands.

But can they adapt fast enough to slow the erosion of their audience?

"The challenge to our business is how do we co-opt the file-swapping world to become a part of our business?" says Charles Goldstuck, president and chief operating officer of J Records, home to artists such as Alicia Keys, Luther Vandross, O-Town and Busta Rhymes.

File-swapping could be "a positive for our business, because it has raised the awareness of music among the consumer base to an unprecedented level, and that cannot be a bad thing," he says. "How do we use that as a positive?"

The doomsayers certainly have a lot on their side. After 10 years of growth in the music business, 2001 marked the first year that music sales declined, by 5 percent overall. Sales this year are down approximately 12 percent from the same period last year.

While some of the drop can be blamed on the burst of the teen music bubble, another obvious culprit is the growth of Internet piracy and recordable CDs.

Click at the 'source' for the full article!


Previous
Next
Samsung electro-mechanics targets No. 1 position in optical pickups by 2007        All News        Samsung electro-mechanics targets No. 1 position in optical pickups by 2007
Samsung electro-mechanics targets No. 1 position in optical pickups by 2007     Optical Storage News      Samsung electro-mechanics targets No. 1 position in optical pickups by 2007

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Search Engines Play A role In Piracy: study
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA
France Drops Three-strikes Law
Australian Police Sized 80,000 Counterfeit DVDs
Web Piracy Does Not Affect Music Sales, Study Says
France Proposes Tougher Anti-Piracy Laws

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .