Thursday, October 19, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Samsung Unifies IoT Services Under SmartThings, Announces Bixby 2.0, AR Capabilities to Galaxy smartphones, a 360 Round Camera
HP Launches the Powerful ZBook X2 Detachable PC
Motorola Unveils Smart Speaker with Amazon Alexa For Moto Z Phones
Apple and GE Partner to bring Industrial Apps to iPhone and iPad
ICDM to Establish New Display Evaluation Standards Based on Samsung and LG Proposals
Globalfoundries and Intel to Talk About 10, 7nm at IEDM
Intel and Mobileye Offer Present Algorithms to Prove the Safety of Autonomous Vehicles
Chinese BOE and CSOT to Invest in Japanese JOLED, Adding Pressure to South Korean Rivals
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > PC Parts > AMD Ryz...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Friday, May 26, 2017
AMD Ryzen AGESA 1.0.0.6 Firmware to Enable Speedy Memory Clocks


AMD says that their upcoming AGESA 1.0.0.6 firmware for the AMD Ryzen will enhance memory overclocking and compability, and will bring virtualization-related features.

AGESA is an acronym that stands for "AMD Generic Encapsulated System Architecture." The AGESA is responsible for initializing AMD x86-64 processors during boot time, acting as something of a "nucleus" for the BIOS for your motherboard. Motherboard vendors take the core capabilities of our AGESA updates and build on them with their own "secret sauce" to create the BIOS files you download and flash. Today, the BIOS files for AMD AM4 motherboards are largely based on AGESA version 1.0.0.4.

AMD has began beta testing a new AGESA (v1.0.0.6) that is largely focused on aiding the stability of overclocked DRAM (>DDR4-2667). Testing has begun transitioning into release candidate and/or production BIOSes for you to download. Depending on the QA/testing practices of your motherboard vendor, full BIOSes based on this code could be available for your AM4 motherboard starting in mid to late June. Some customers may already be in luck, however, as there are motherboards-like the Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5 and ASUS Crosshair VI-that already have public betas.

If you're the kind of user that just needs virtualization, then AGESA 1.0.0.6-based firmware will bring fresh support for PCI Express Access Control Services (ACS). ACS primarily enables support for manual assignment of PCIe graphics cards within logical containers called "IOMMU groups." The hardware resources of an IOMMU group can then be dedicated to a virtual machine.

This capability is useful for users that want 3D-accelerated graphics inside a virtual machine. With ACS support, it is possible to split a 2-GPU system such that a host Linux OS and a Windows VM both have a dedicated graphics cards. The virtual machine can access all the capabilities of the dedicated GPU, and run games inside the virtual machine at near-native performance.

Most importantly, AGESA 1.0.0.6 officially adds 26 new parameters that can improve the compatibility and reliability of DRAM, especially for memory that does not follow the industry-standard JEDEC specifications (e.g. faster than 2667, manual overclocking, or XMP2 profiles).

The AM4 platform has so far been effectively limited to memory speeds of DDR4-3200. Not only that, but the supported range of options from DDR4-1866 to DDR4-3200 was in large 266MT/s increments. With AGESA 1.0.0.6, memory frequencies have not only been expanded all the way up to DDR4-4000, but between DDR4-2667 and DDR4-4000 the increments have been reduced to 133MT/s. This mean that more memory kits will be able to be run at their rated speed and also reduces the high-speed memory gap that the AM4 platform had with Intel's mainstream LGA1151 platform.

The update also unlocks new memory timings. Up until now, only five primary memory timings have been adjustable and there wasn't even a command rate option, which was natively locked to the most aggressive 1T setting. All of this should help improve overclocking and compatibility with DDR4 memory kits that have been engineered with Intel platforms in mind.



Previous
Next
Chip Industry "Threatened" by Chinese Players        All News        Nvidia Introduces the GeForce MX150 For Laptops
New Toshiba XG5 of NVMe SSDs are Using 64-Layer 3D Flash Memory     PC Parts News      Intel Dominates the Enterprise SSD Market

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
AMD Unveils the Embedded Radeon E9170 GPU Based on Polaris Architecture
AMD's Ryzen Threadripper CPUs Get NVMe RAID Support
AMD 'Pinnacle Ridge' Series of 12nm Ryzen Processors Coming Early 2018
AMD Zen 2 "Matisse" Architecture Coming in 2019: report
GPU Shipments Increased from Previous Quarter
AMD Radeon RX Vega Graphics Cards and Radeon Packs Available Now
AMD Launches the Ryzen Threadripper High End Desktop Processors
AMD's new Threadripper 1900X Costs $549
AMD's Radeon RX Vega 64 will cost $499, Radeon RX Vega 56 is $100 Cheaper
AMD Completes Ryzen Mainstream Desktop Lineup with the Affordable Ryzen 3 processors
GPUs and Ryzen Processors Help AMD's Financial Figures
AMD Tests Memory Overclocking On Ryzen Systems

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .