Friday, November 28, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Syrian Electronic Army targets CNBC, Telegraph, Independent, PCWorld
GoPro Camera Drones In The Works: report
European Parliament Votes To Break Up Google
LG Electronics Streamlines Structure, Names New Presidents of Home and Mobile Segments
Microsoft Accidentally Anounced Acquisition Of Acompli
Microsoft Offers Massive Music Deals For The Holidays
ETRI Develops 10Gbps Internet Speeds Technology
New Asus Strix 7.1 Surround Gaming Headset Released
Active Discussions
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
 Home > News > Optical Storage > Austral...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, July 01, 2002
Australia considers CD copying deal...


In a move that counteracts the hard stance in the United States, Australian music industry officials are gauging a plan to endorse compact disc-copying vending machines. The proposal is an example of the measures major record companies may have to swallow as technological advances in music distribution are made, or risk being accused of anticompetitive behavior, a legal expert involved in the industry said Wednesday.

An Australian maker of compact disc burners asked the Australian Record Industry Association, or ARIA, and the Australian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society to let the machines be operated in public places in return for a small royalty fee for every compact disc copied.

Greg Moore, chief executive of Adelaide-based Little Ripper CD Burner Pty. Ltd., said the coin-operated machines were intended for use by people who want to make backup copies of their own CDs in case of damage or loss of the original.

Under Australian copyright law, that is illegal.

The burners could be located in convenience stores across the country, and would charge about 5 Australian dollars, or $2.85, to copy a disc, Moore said. A small percentage of that fee would go toward royalties.

Exact details of how the royalties would be distributed haven't been divulged.

Some CD copying machines have already been installed in convenience stores around Australia by independent operators. They work under the same legal obligations as photocopiers — the onus is on users, and not the machines' owners, to uphold copyright laws.

Moore said the Australian Mechanical Copyright Owners Society, or AMCOS, which represents some 30,000 songwriters and music publishers, was "very receptive" to his proposal.

"We're negotiating a deal. It's not finalized, but it's progressing nicely," Moore told The Associated Press.

AMCOS transmission licensing director Richard Mallett confirmed that the society was in talks with Little Ripper, "but precise details of any licensing agreements have not been discussed."

Michael Speck, of ARIA's anti-piracy investigations unit, also confirmed the record industry lobby group was looking at the proposal.

"An approach has been made and it will be considered," he said. "However, I can see some significant difficulties in anyone in the process adequately, fairly or justly compensating the copyright owners."

Speck said there were legitimate uses for the devices, but "the risk of a burner being used for illegitimate purposes increases dramatically when it's put on a street corner."

Owen Trembath, a former music lawyer turned industry consultant, said the proposal gave the record industry little room to maneuver.

He said if record companies agree to the deal, but inflate the price of licensing fees charged to the vending machine owners to protect their own product, they may be at risk of being accused of anticompetitive business practices.

If they don't agree to the proposal, the vending machines could ultimately flourish, and record companies and song writers won't see any sort of payment, he said.


Previous
Next
Adaptec And NEC Demonstrate Video Streaming Over ISCSI        All News        Adaptec And NEC Demonstrate Video Streaming Over ISCSI
Sony to launch DVD-RW-enabled recorder!     Optical Storage News      Sony to launch DVD-RW-enabled recorder!

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Pirate Bay Co-founder Sentenced To 42 Months Imprisonment
Search Engines Play A role In Piracy: study
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA
France Drops Three-strikes Law
Australian Police Sized 80,000 Counterfeit DVDs
Web Piracy Does Not Affect Music Sales, Study Says

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .