Thursday, December 18, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Facebook And Android Top Digital Trends For 2014
Your Next Car Could Have Android Inside
North Korea Linked To Recent Sony Hacking
Sony Global Education Established
CEA and Japan Audio Society to Jointly Promote Hi-Res Audio
Intel, IBM Follow Different Strategies On 14nm FinFET
Toshiba Announces 6TB Enterprise Capacity HDD Models
WebOS 2.0 Smart TV Platfom To Debut At CES
Active Discussions
Windows xp
Will there be any trade in scheme for the coming PSP Go?
Hello, Glad to be Aboard!!!
Best optical drive for ripping CD's? My LG 4163B is mediocre.
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
 Home > News > General Computing > Faceboo...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Saturday, August 03, 2013
Facebook Has Paid $1 million Bounties To Keep Products Secure


Facebook's Bug Bounty program which rewards security researchers who report security issues to the company, has paid out more than $1 million in bounties so far, according to the company.

Facebook said that 329 people had received a bounty so far, including professional researchers, students or part-timers. These researchers are spread across 51 different countries, and only 20% of bounties paid out so far have been to US-based recipients.

The countries with the most bounty recipients are, in order, the US, India, UK, Turkey, and Germany. The countries with the fastest growing number of recipients are, in order, the US, India, Turkey, Israel, Canada, Germany, Pakistan, Egypt, Brazil, Sweden, and Russia.

Facebook's largest single bounty so far has been $20,000, but some individual researchers have already earned more than $100,000. Two recipients have since taken full-time jobs with the Facebook security team.

"This early progress is really encouraging, in no small part because programs like these can have a significant impact on our ability to keep Facebook secure," Collin Greene, a Facebook Security Engineer wrote in a blog post.

As the program continues to expand, Facebook shed more light on the general criteria the company uses to determine the amount to pay researchers when they submit a bug. Facebook bases these decisions on four primary factors: impact, quality of communication (detailed instructions on how to reproduce the issue), target (Facebook.com, Instagram, HHVM, and Facebook's mobile applications), and secondary damage ( bugs that lead Facebook's engineers to more bugs get bigger payouts.)

If you're interested in participating in the program, please head to https://www.facebook.com/whitehat/ to learn more.


Previous
Next
ASUS Unveils ROG Tytan G70 Gaming Desktop PC        All News        Twitter Updates Rules On Abusive Behaviour
Wikipedia To Be Encrypted     General Computing News      Twitter Updates Rules On Abusive Behaviour

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Facebook And Android Top Digital Trends For 2014
Dutch Privacy Watchdog Probes Facebook
Facebook Says No To 'dislike' button
Facebook Develops Virtual Assistant
Facebook Makes Search Easier
Facebook Introduces the Facebook Groups App And FB Techwire
Facebook Develops Website For Professionals: report
Facebook To Reduce Promotional Posts in News Feed
Facebook Puts New Altoona Data Center Online
Facebook Tries To Explain Its New Privacy Policy Rules
Facebook Introduces Say Thanks
Facebook Says Messenger App Has 500 Million Monthly Users

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .