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 Home > News > General Computing > NHK Fix...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, May 16, 2013
NHK Fixes OLED Longevity Problem, Advances Terrestrial Transmission of 8K Signals


Japan public broadcaster NHK announced to separate achievements today related to the longevity of OLED and the efficient digital terrestrial transmission of 8K video signals.

Generally, the pixels of an OLED display don't last long, especially when they are exposed to the air - they can lose half of their brightness in just 100 days. Of course, OLED displays are protected from the air but still, according to NHK, the cathode and the electron injection layer of OLED devices have typically a short life.

NHK and Nippon Shokubai have developed 'iOLED' or inverse structure OLED. The companies inverted the anode and cathode layers in the traditional configurations of an OLED device, and then added an additional protective coating above the cathode. The result is a display that retains its brightness even when not fully sealed from the environment.



This sort of solution could make its way into OLED TVs by the time OLED TVs are actually affordable.

NHK also today announced a successful terrestrial transmission of Super Hi-Vision (7,680 x 4,320) video using terrestrial transmission technology.

Super Hi-Vision is an ultra-high-definition video format being developed by NHK for next-generation TV broadcasting.

NHK has made significant research and development efforts related to the ultra-multilevel OFDM transmission technology, combined with dual-polarized MIMO technology.

This time NHK used a single-frequency network or SFN - a broadcast network where several transmitters simultaneously send the same signal over the same frequency channel - along with a space - time code (STC). STC is a method employed to improve the reliability of data transmission in wireless communication systems using multiple transmit antennas. STCs rely on transmitting multiple, redundant copies of a data stream to the receiver in the hope that at least some of them may survive the physical path between transmission and reception in a good enough state to allow reliable decoding. NHK claims that the received signal was stable and strong.

Below you see the a scheme of the SFN transmission technology as it was published by NHK:



Both the iOLED and the SHV transmission developments will be detailed at the "Open House 2013" event held in the 30th of May in Tokyo, Japan.

8K Film at Cannes

In related news, NHK will showcase its 8K Super Hi-Vision (SHV) format with screenings at Cannes on May 16 and 17.

The film will be shown on a 220-inch screen to demonstrate SHV 8K, which boasts 16 times the resolution of current HD. The format features a 22.2 channel audio system that was also developed by NHK.

The equipment for 8K was developed in collaboration with Fujitsu, JVC, Panasonic and Sharp, according to NHK.

NKH believes that 8K TV will be the final two-dimensional television format, and any further developments will be in 3D.

Research into the next-generation of 3D is already underway in NHK labs. But they follow a different approach than current stereoscopic 3D format, provides a different image to the left and right eye to create a 3D image in the brain. NHK is researching a 3D technology that creates actual spatial images in front of the screen. NHK?s researchers believe it may take as long as 20 years to bring the system into homes, as it would require 10 to 100 times as many pixels as Super Hi-Vision, which needs about 33 million pixels.


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