Friday, October 31, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Sharp To Produce New Backlight-free LCD Panel For Wearables
New Cameras Boost GoPro's Quarterly Profit
Panasonic AX800 4K ULTRA HD TVs Update Adds Compatibility With Netflix 4K Streaming
YouTube Now Supports 60fps Videos
Samsung Brings Gear S to U.S. Next Week
Corsair Introduces Sabre RGB Mice For Gamers
Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed Unity Included with Purchase of Samsung UD590 Monitor or 850 PRO Series SSD
Apple's Tim Cook Declares His Sexual Orientation
Active Discussions
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Questions durability monitor LCD
 Home > News > PC Parts > IBM Unv...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Saturday, August 20, 2011
IBM Unveils Cognitive Computing Chips


IBM's researchers unveiled a new generation of experimental computer chips designed to emulate the brain's abilities for perception, action and cognition.

The technology could yield many orders of magnitude less power consumption and space than used in today's computers.

IBM?s first neurosynaptic computing chips recreate the phenomena between spiking neurons and synapses in biological systems, such as the brain, through advanced algorithms and silicon circuitry. Its first two prototype chips have already been fabricated and are currently undergoing testing.

Called cognitive computers, systems built with these chips won?t be programmed the same way traditional computers are today. Rather, cognitive computers are expected to learn through experiences, find correlations, create hypotheses, and remember ? and learn from ? the outcomes, mimicking the brains structural and synaptic plasticity.

To do this, IBM is combining principles from nanoscience, neuroscience and supercomputing as part of a multi-year cognitive computing initiative. The company and its university collaborators also announced they have been awarded approximately $21 million in new funding from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) for Phase 2 of the Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) project.

The goal of SyNAPSE is to create a system that not only analyzes complex information from multiple sensory modalities at once, but also dynamically rewires itself as it interacts with its environment - all while rivaling the brain?s compact size and low power usage. The IBM team has already successfully completed Phases 0 and 1.

"This is a major initiative to move beyond the von Neumann paradigm that has been ruling computer architecture for more than half a century," said Dharmendra Modha, project leader for IBM Research. "Future applications of computing will increasingly demand functionality that is not efficiently delivered by the traditional architecture. These chips are another significant step in the evolution of computers from calculators to learning systems, signaling the beginning of a new generation of computers and their applications in business, science and government."

While they contain no biological elements, IBM?s first cognitive computing prototype chips use digital silicon circuits inspired by neurobiology to make up what is referred to as a "neurosynaptic core" with integrated memory (replicated synapses), computation (replicated neurons) and communication (replicated axons).

IBM has two working prototype designs. Both cores were fabricated in 45 nm SOI-CMOS and contain 256 neurons. One core contains 262,144 programmable synapses and the other contains 65,536 learning synapses. The IBM team has successfully demonstrated simple applications like navigation, machine vision, pattern recognition, associative memory and classification.

IBM?s overarching cognitive computing architecture is an on-chip network of light-weight cores, creating a single integrated system of hardware and software. This architecture represents a critical shift away from traditional von Neumann computing to a potentially more power-efficient architecture that has no set programming, integrates memory with processor, and mimics the brain's event-driven, distributed and parallel processing.

IBM's long-term goal is to build a chip system with ten billion neurons and hundred trillion synapses, while consuming merely one kilowatt of power and occupying less than two liters of volume.

Future chips will be able to ingest information from complex, real-world environments through multiple sensory modes and act through multiple motor modes in a coordinated, context-dependent manner.

For example, a cognitive computing system monitoring the world's water supply could contain a network of sensors and actuators that constantly record and report metrics such as temperature, pressure, wave height, acoustics and ocean tide, and issue tsunami warnings based on its decision making. Similarly, a grocer stocking shelves could use an instrumented glove that monitors sights, smells, texture and temperature to flag bad or contaminated produce. Making sense of real-time input flowing at an ever-dizzying rate would be a Herculean task for today?s computers, but would be natural for a brain-inspired system.

"Imagine traffic lights that can integrate sights, sounds and smells and flag unsafe intersections before disaster happens or imagine cognitive co-processors that turn servers, laptops, tablets, and phones into machines that can interact better with their environments," said Dr. Modha.

For Phase 2 of SyNAPSE, IBM has assembled a multi-dimensional team of researchers and collaborators to achieve these ambitious goals. The team includes Columbia University; Cornell University; University of California, Merced; and University of Wisconsin, Madison.

IBM?s cognitive computing chips were built at its chip-making facility in Fishkill, N.Y. and are currently being tested at its research labs in Yorktown Heights, N.Y. and San Jose, Calif.


Previous
Next
Apple Seeks To Ban Samsung's Android Phones From Europe        All News        Seagate At IFA 2011
AMD Boosts Its AMD Fusion APUs for Notebooks, Ultrathins, All-in-Ones and Desktops     PC Parts News      Seagate At IFA 2011

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Twitter and IBM Form Partner to Data Analytics
Glonbalfoundries Buy IBM's Micorelectronics Business
New IBM Tape Cartridge Holds 10TB Uncompressed Data
IBM and SAP Partner On Enterprise Cloud
IBM Claims New OpenPOWER-Based Systems Are Superior Alternative to x86-Based Servers
Lenovo Set to Close Acquisition of IBM's x86 Server Business
IBM Offers Watson Data Tool To the Mainstream
IBM and Intel Bring New Security Features to the Cloud
IBM Tries To Strengthen Its Presence In China With Local Vendor Deal
U.S. Regulators Clear Sale Of IBM's Server Business to Lenovo
New IBM Chip Simulates Brain Functions
IBM Offered Globalfoundries 1bn Dollars To Take Chip unit: report

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .