Thursday, March 23, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Major Advertisers Boycott Youtube Advertising, At Least For Now
Samsung and eSilicon Taped Out First 14nm Network Processor
Now You Can Go Live On Facebook From Your Computer
Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 Benchmarks
Google Maps Lets Others Track You
Google Plans Faster Updates To Keep Android Phones Safe
Apple's iPhone 6s Topped List of Best-Selling Smartphones for 2016
Google Says Hacked sites Rose in 2016
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > PC Parts > Intel E...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, June 20, 2011
Intel Equipped to Lead Industry to Era of Exascale Computing


During the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC), Intel discussed its strategy to lead the industry in the era of Exascale computing, and the role that the Intel Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture will play.

Kirk Skaugen, Intel Corporation vice president and general manager of the Data Center Group, outlined Intel's vision to achieve ExaFLOP/s performance by the end of this decade. An ExaFLOP/s is quintillion computer operations per second, hundreds times more than today's fastest supercomputers.

Reaching exascale levels of performance in the future will not only require the combined efforts of industry and governments, but also approaches being pioneered by the Intel Many Integrated Core (Intel MIC) Architecture, according to Skaugen.

"While Intel Xeon processors are the clear architecture of choice for the current TOP500 list of supercomputers, Intel is further expanding its focus on high-performance computing by enabling the industry for the next frontier with our Many Integrated Core architecture for petascale and future exascale workloads," said Skaugen.

Intel's pursuit of Moore's Law -- doubling the transistor density on microprocessors roughly every 2 years to increase functionality and performance while decreasing costs -- combined with an efficient software programming model and extreme system scalability were noted by Skaugen as key ingredients for crossing the threshold of petascale computing into a new era of exascale computing. With this increase in performance, though, comes a significant increase in power consumption.

As an example, for today's fastest supercomputer in China, the Tianhe-1A, to achieve exascale performance, it would require more than 1.6 GW of power - an amount large enough to supply electricity to 2 million homes ? thus presenting an energy efficiency challenge.

To address this challenge, Intel and European researchers have established three European labs with three main goals: to create a sustained partner presence in Europe; take advantage of the growing relevance of European high-performance computing (HPC) research; and exponentially grow capabilities in computational science, engineering and strategic computing. One of the technical goals of these labs is to create simulation applications that begin to address the energy efficiency challenges of moving to exascale performance.

Skaugen said there is the potential for tremendous growth of the HPC market. While supercomputers from the 1980s delivered GigaFLOP/s (billions of floating point operations per second) performance, today's most powerful machines have increased this value by several million times. This, in turn, has increased the demand for processors used in supercomputing. By 2013 Intel expects the top 100 supercomputers in the world to use one million processors. By 2015 this number is expected to double, and is forecasted to reach 8 million units by the end of the decade. The performance of the TOP500 #1 system is estimated to reach 100 PetaFLOP/s in 2015 and break the barrier of 1 ExaFLOP/s in 2018. By the end of the decade the fastest system on Earth is forecasted to be able to provide performance of more than 4 ExaFLOP/s.

Intel MIC Architecture Software Development

Relative to the multi-core Intel Xeon processors, Intel MIC Architecture has many more smaller cores, many more hardware threads, and wider vector units. This is ideal for achieving higher aggregate performance for highly parallel applications.

The Intel MIC architecture is a key addition to the company's existing products, including Intel Xeon processors, and expected to help lead the industry into the era of exascale computing. The first Intel MIC product, codenamed "Knights Corner," is planned for production on Intel's 22-nanometer technology that featuring 3-D Tri-Gate transistors. Intel is currently shipping Intel MIC software development platforms, codenamed '"Knights Ferry," to select development partners.



As developers embrace high degrees of parallelism (instruction, data, task, vector, thread, cluster, etc.), important and popular programming models for Intel Architecture processors extend to Intel MIC Architecture without rethinking the entire problem. The same techniques that deliver performance on Intel processors - scaling applications to cores and threads, blocking data for hierarchical memory and caches, and effective use of SIMD - also apply to maximizing performance on Intel MIC Architecture. With greater reuse of parallel CPU code, software companies and IT departments benefit from creating and maintaining a single code base binary and not having to re-train developers on proprietary programming models associated with accelerators.

Knights Ferry Software Development Platform

- Up to 32 cores/128 threads
- 512b SIMD support
- Fully coherent cache
- Up to 2GB GDDR5 memory
- Latest Intel SW Developer Products

At ISC, Intel and some of its partners including Forschungszentrum Juelich, Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ), CERN and Korea Institute of Science and Technology Information (KISTI) showed early results of their work with the "Knights Ferry" platform. The demonstrations showed how Intel MIC architecture delivers both performance and software programmability advantages.

"The programming model advantage of Intel MIC architecture enabled us to quickly scale our applications running on Intel Xeon processors to the Knights Ferry Software Development Platform," said Prof. Arndt Bode of the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre. "This workload was originally developed and optimized for Intel Xeon processors but due to the familiarity of the programming model we could optimize the code for the Intel MIC architecture within hours and also achieved over 650 GFLOPS of performance."

Intel also showed server and workstation platforms from SGI, Dell, HP, IBM, Colfax and Supermicro, all of which are working with Intel to plan products based on "Knights Corner."


Previous
Next
Adobe Enables Developers to Build Mobile Apps for Android Devices, BlackBerry PlayBook, iPhone and iPad        All News        Sony Releases New PS3 Console In Japan
CUDA Now Available For More x86 Processors     PC Parts News      SandisK Launches New Enterprise SSDs

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Intel Launches Bug Bounty Program
Intel To Buy Mobileye For About $15 Billion
Intel Security releases EFI rootkit checker Following WikiLeaks Reports
Second Generation Second Intel Rack Scale Design Showcases Storage Resource Pooling
Intel Showcases 5G Advancements at 2017 Mobile World Congress
Intel Announces 5G Mobile Trial Platform, New Atom And Xeon Processors
Intel Optane Memory Products Will Run Only On Systems With 7th Generation Intel Processors
Intel Is Offering New Integrated and Automated Security Solutions
Intel Unveils New FPGA for Industrial and Automotive Markets
Intel Says 8thGen Core Is Coming On 14nm, Talks About Datacenter and Optane
Intel Touts Record Performance Of New 24-core Xeon Processor E7-8894 v4
Intel's Fab 42 will Target Advanced 7 nm Technology

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .