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Saturday, June 04, 2011
Major Music Labels to Support Apple's Upcoming Music Service


Apple has reportedly secured licensing deals from all four major labels and music publishers in order to power the company's iCloud service.

Apple CEO Steve Jobs will unveil the iCloud music service at the company's annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) on Monday, June 6. iCloud is expected to let users upload their music collections into "digital lockers" and then stream their songs to personal computers or to iPhones and iPads.

Reuters today reported that Apple will pay major music publishers (Warner Music Group, EMI Group, Sony Music Entertainment and Universal Music Group) a 12 percent cut of iCloud revenue.

Meanwhile, Google is still negotiating with the major labels and publishers for its Music Beta cloud service, which it unveiled May 11 at the Google I/O conference in San Francisco.

Recently, Google and Amazon.com Inc have also launched their own 'cloud' music services. However, both companies have not signed new licensing agreements with the record companies.

"Music Beta by Google" functions much like a digital music locker, allowing users to upload their music to a remote server and play songs from any computer browser or through an app that runs on smartphones and tablets using the Android operating system.

Amazon's music service (Cloud Drive) allows users to store about 1,000 songs on its web servers for free instead of their own hard drives and play them over an Internet connection directly from web browsers. Users are able to listen to songs they have uploaded to the service but they are not be able to download the files.


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