Tuesday, July 26, 2016
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Crucial Expands The MX300 SSD Line
Amazon To Start Testing Drone Deliveries In The UK Skies
Ritek To Start Bio-testing Optical Discs
Kingston UV400 SSD Released
Nvidia Quadro P6000 GPU Delivers 12 Teraflops of Performance
AMD Radeon Pro Solid State Graphics Combines Polaris GPU With SSD Flash Memory
OLED to Become Leading Smartphone Display Technology
Softbank's Pepper Robot Now Available In Taiwan
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > General Computing > Researc...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, February 17, 2011
Researchers Develop Wireless Technology For Faster Networks


A new technology that allows wireless signals to be sent and received simultaneously on a single channel has been developed by Stanford researchers. Their research could help build faster, more efficient communication networks, at least doubling the speed of existing networks.

Radio traffic can flow in only one direction at a time on a specific frequency, hence the frequent use of "over" by pilots and air traffic controllers, walkie-talkie users and emergency personnel as they take turns speaking.

But now, Stanford researchers have developed the first wireless radios that can send and receive signals at the same time.

This immediately makes them twice as fast as existing technology, and with further tweaking will likely lead to even faster and more efficient networks in the future.

"Textbooks say you can't do it," said Philip Levis, assistant professor of computer science and of electrical engineering. "The new system completely reworks our assumptions about how wireless networks can be designed," he said.

Cell phone networks allow users to talk and listen simultaneously, but they use a work-around that is expensive and requires careful planning, making the technique less feasible for other wireless networks, including Wi-Fi.

A trio of electrical engineering graduate students began working on a new approach when they came up with a seemingly simple idea. What if radios could do the same thing our brains do when we listen and talk simultaneously: screen out the sound of our own voice?

In most wireless networks, each device has to take turns speaking or listening. "It's like two people shouting messages to each other at the same time," said Levis. "If both people are shouting at the same time, neither of them will hear the other."

It took the students several months to figure out how to build the new radio. Their main roadblock to two-way simultaneous conversation was this: Incoming signals are overwhelmed by the radio's own transmissions, making it impossible to talk and listen at the same time.

"When a radio is transmitting, its own transmission is millions, billions of times stronger than anything else it might hear [from another radio]," Levis said. "It's trying to hear a whisper while you yourself are shouting."

But, the researchers realized, if a radio receiver could filter out the signal from its own transmitter, weak incoming signals could be heard. "You can make it so you don't hear your own shout and you can hear someone else's whisper," Levis said.

Their setup takes advantage of the fact that each radio knows exactly what it's transmitting, and hence what its receiver should filter out. The process is analogous to noise-canceling headphones.

The most obvious effect of sending and receiving signals simultaneously is that it instantly doubles the amount of information you can send, Levis said. That means much-improved home and office networks that are faster and less congested.

But Levis also sees the technology having larger impacts, such as overcoming a major problem with air traffic control communications. With current systems, if two aircraft try to call the control tower at the same time on the same frequency, neither will get through. Levis says these blocked transmissions have caused aircraft collisions, which the new system would help prevent.

The group has a provisional patent on the technology and is working to commercialize it. They are currently trying to increase both the strength of the transmissions and the distances over which they work. These improvements are necessary before the technology is practical for use in Wi-Fi networks.

But even more promising are the system's implications for future networks. Once hardware and software are built to take advantage of simultaneous two-way transmission, "there's no predicting the scope of the results," Levis said.


Previous
Next
Samsung Launches New 3D Smart TV Line        All News        New Interface Standard Enables Delivery of Full HD Audio and Video Between Smart Mobile Devices and TVs
Windows 7 SP1 Available to MSDN Subscribers     General Computing News      Google Offers Publishers Manage Access to Digital Content

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
LG's Portable Art Speaker Combine Art With Music
New BeoPlay A1 Speaker Offers Solid Audio And Portability
Verizon Wireless to Pay $1.35 Million Fine to Settle "Supercookie" Probe
WPC Increases Power In New Qi Wireless Power Standard Specification
Sony Announces Pricing and Availability for Three New Portable Wireless Bluetooth Speakers
IKEA Adds Wireless Charging To Furniture
WPC Extends Capabilities of wireless Power Standard
Verizon Under Fire Over Smart Cookies
Freescale To Launch First Qi-compliant Wireless Charging Solution
Sony's Wireless Speakers Available Today Starting From $200
Tech Companies Push for Better Wi-Fi Access
Rival Wireless Charging Groups Join Forces

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2016 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .