Wednesday, December 17, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
ICANN Targeted in Phishing Attack
BlackBerry Classic Makes Official Debut
LG, Samsung, To Dominate The TV Market in 2015
Renesas Develops 16nm FinFET SRAM
Sony Film Debut Canceled After Threats
New Nintendo Devices To Use 'free-form' LCDs
Sony Single-Lens OLED Display Module Turns Any Eyewear Into Smartglasses
Dutch Privacy Watchdog Probes Facebook
Active Discussions
Will there be any trade in scheme for the coming PSP Go?
Hello, Glad to be Aboard!!!
Best optical drive for ripping CD's? My LG 4163B is mediocre.
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
 Home > News > PC Parts > New Dev...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, January 24, 2011
New Device May Revolutionize Computer Memory


Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new device that represents a significant advance for computer memory, making large-scale "server farms" more energy efficient and allowing computers to start more quickly.

Traditionally, there are two types of computer memory devices. Slow memory devices are used in persistent data storage technologies such as flash drives. They allow us to save information for extended periods of time, and are therefore called nonvolatile devices. Fast memory devices allow our computers to operate quickly, but aren't able to save data when the computers are turned off. The necessity for a constant source of power makes them volatile devices.

But now a research team from NC State has developed a single "unified" device that can perform both volatile and nonvolatile memory operation and may be used in the main memory.

"We?ve invented a new device that may revolutionize computer memory," says Dr. Paul Franzon, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at NC State and co-author of a paper describing the research. "Our device is called a double floating-gate field effect transistor (FET). Existing nonvolatile memory used in data storage devices utilizes a single floating gate, which stores charge in the floating gate to signify a 1 or 0 in the device - or one 'bit' of information. By using two floating gates, the device can store a bit in a nonvolatile mode, and/or it can store a bit in a fast, volatile mode - like the normal main memory on your computer."

The double floating-gate FET could have a significant impact on a number of computer problems. For example, it would allow computers to start immediately, because the computer wouldn?t have to retrieve start-up data from its hard drive ? the data could be stored in its main memory.

The new device would also allow "power proportional computing." For example, Web server farms, such as those used by Google, consume an enormous amount of power - even when there are low levels of user activity - in part because the server farms can?t turn off the power without affecting their main memory.

"The double floating-gate FET would help solve this problem," Franzon says, "because data could be stored quickly in nonvolatile memory - and retrieved just as quickly. This would allow portions of the server memory to be turned off during periods of low use without affecting performance."

Franzon also notes that the research team has investigated questions about this technology's reliability, and that they think the device "can have a very long lifetime, when it comes to storing data in the volatile mode."


Previous
Next
Sharp Files LCD Patent Infringement Lawsuits against AUO        All News        Researchers Showcase Holographic TV Concept
Hitachi Ships 7,200 RPM, 3TB Hard Disk Drive     PC Parts News      Apple's App Store Downloads Top 10 Billion

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .