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 Home > News > General Computing > Italy C...
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Wednesday, February 24, 2010
Italy Convicts Google Execs for Violating Privacy Laws


An Italian court convicted three Google executives on Wednesday for violating the privacy of an Italian boy with Down's syndrome by letting a video of him being bullied be posted on the site in 2006.

Google said that it would appeal the six-month suspended jail terms and said the verdict "poses a crucial question for the freedom on which the internet is built," since none of the three employees found guilty had anything to do with the offending video.

In late 2006, students at a school in Turin, Italy filmed and then uploaded a video to Google Video that showed them bullying an autistic schoolmate.

"The video was totally reprehensible and we took it down within hours of being notified by the Italian police," Matt Sucherman, Google VP and Deputy General Counsel - Europe, Middle East and Africa wrote at the company's blog.

"We also worked with the local police to help identify the person responsible for uploading it and she was subsequently sentenced to 10 months community service by a court in Turin, as were several other classmates who were also involved. In these rare but unpleasant cases, that's where our involvement would normally end," he added.

But in this instance, a public prosecutor in Milan decided to indict four Google employees ?David Drummond, Arvind Desikan, Peter Fleischer and George Reyes (who left the company in 2008). The charges brought against them were criminal defamation and a failure to comply with the Italian privacy code.

"To be clear, none of the four Googlers charged had anything to do with this video. They did not appear in it, film it, upload it or review it. None of them know the people involved or were even aware of the video's existence until after it was removed," Mr. Sucherman said.

Nevertheless, a judge in Milan today convicted 3 of the 4 defendants ? David Drummond, Peter Fleischer and George Reyes ? for failure to comply with the Italian privacy code. All 4 were found not guilty of criminal defamation.

"In essence this ruling means that employees of hosting platforms like Google Video are criminally responsible for content that users upload. We will appeal this astonishing decision because the Google employees on trial had nothing to do with the video in question. Throughout this long process, they have displayed admirable grace and fortitude. It is outrageous that they have been subjected to a trial at all," Google's executive added.

Google believes that this conviction attacks the very principles of freedom on which the Internet is built.

"Common sense dictates that only the person who films and uploads a video to a hosting platform could take the steps necessary to protect the privacy and obtain the consent of the people they are filming. European Union law was drafted specifically to give hosting providers a safe harbor from liability so long as they remove illegal content once they are notified of its existence. The belief, rightly in our opinion, was that a notice and take down regime of this kind would help creativity flourish and support free speech while protecting personal privacy. If that principle is swept aside and sites like Blogger, YouTube and indeed every social network and any community bulletin board, are held responsible for vetting every single piece of content that is uploaded to them ? every piece of text, every photo, every file, every video ? then the Web as we know it will cease to exist, and many of the economic, social, political and technological benefits it brings could disappear," Mr. Sucherman said.


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