Saturday, October 25, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Google's Pichai to Become Head of Product at Google: report
Internet Explorer 11 Toolkit Allows Enterprise Admins "Spy" On Their Employees
FCC Says Airwave Auction To Delay Until 2016
HP Broadens Moonshot Portfolio With Intel-powered Models
Microsoft To Keep Nokia Brand For Low-end Smartphones
LG Introduces Its First Octa-Core Application Processor
Cloud and Surface 3 Drive Microsoft's Revenue
Micron Urges Investors To Reject TRC Capital's Unsolicited Tender Offer
Active Discussions
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
 Home > News > Optical Storage > RIAA Sa...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, January 02, 2008
RIAA Says Copying Your Own CDs is Illegal


The Recording Industry Ass. of America (RIAA) has begun a legal spat with a man who copied CDs he had bought, into his computer. Jeffery Howell of Scottsdale, Arizon has taken his case to court after he received a letter from the RIAA, according to the Washington Post.

The following report is from the Inquirer which like many sites, cites the original report that appeared in the Washington Post. However, it now appears that the RIAA may be suing Jeffery Howell for placing the ripped files in a shared directory and not necessarily for ripping the contents of the CD to his computer.

The RIAA, which lobbies on behalf of a music industry hammered by tumbling sales as fans increasingly turn to free downloads and file sharing for their listening pleasure, insists that it is illegal for someone who has legally bought a CD to transfer that music into his computer.

And, it seems that Howell is the latest individual the RIAA has singled out for special treatment in its legal pantomime.

RIAA lawyer Ira Schwartz argued in a lawsuit brief filed earlier this month that the 2,000 or so MP3 files Howell created were "unauthorised copies" of copyrighted music.

So far it is unclear as to how and why Howell was targeted by the RIAA. There doesn't seem to be any suggestion that the MP3s were made available to all comers.

On its website the RIAA states: "If you make unauthorised copies of copyrighted music recordings, you're stealing. You're breaking the law and you could be held legally liable for thousands of dollars in damages."

Indeed, underlining its uncompromising stance over what it sees as online music theft the RIAA has already sued Jammie Thomas, a single mother living in Brainerd, Minnesota who ended up in civil court for copyright infringement.

She was stung with a $222,000 fine after the jury returned the verdict that Thomas was liable for wilfully infringing the copyrights on 24 songs.

The RIAA said that it will continue its legal battle against customers that it believes are breaking the law by copying CDs onto their computers.

According to the Washington Post a RIAA spokesman said: "It's not our first choice, but it's a necessary part of the equation. There are consequences for breaking the law."

Of course it remains to be seen whether the industry's inflexible attitude toward a rapidly changing landscape in which fans consume music will hold water in the long game. But this latest move by the big record companies to hold individuals personally responsible perhaps signals how weak at the knees they have truly become.

From The Inquirer



Previous
Next
Xbox 360 With Internal HD-DVD Drive        All News        Wii hacked to play homebrew
Panasonic Preps Slimline Blu-ray Drive for Laptops     Optical Storage News      CMC Chairman on Blu-ray

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Search Engines Play A role In Piracy: study
Microsoft Outlines Basic Elements Of Direct3D 12
CD-R And CD-RW Discs Represent $368 Million in 2013 - CD writers and CD Combo Disappearing
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
New SDXC And SDHC Memory Cards Support 4K2K Video
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
LCD TV Panel Shipments Dip in Q3 For The First Time
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .