Saturday, October 25, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Panasonic to Offload Sanyo's North America TV Business
Google's Pichai to Become Head of Product at Google: report
Internet Explorer 11 Toolkit Allows Enterprise Admins "Spy" On Their Employees
FCC Says Airwave Auction To Delay Until 2016
HP Broadens Moonshot Portfolio With Intel-powered Models
Microsoft To Keep Nokia Brand For Low-end Smartphones
LG Introduces Its First Octa-Core Application Processor
Cloud and Surface 3 Drive Microsoft's Revenue
Active Discussions
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
 Home > News > PC Parts > Moore M...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, September 19, 2007
Moore Muses on End of His Own Law


Gordon Moore, the billionaire co-founder of Intel, says the end of the technology maxim bearing his name is drawing to a close, perhaps as soon as 10 years from now.

Moore's Law -- based on the San Francisco native's observation in 1965 that the number of transistors on a computer chip doubles roughly every two years -- has for more than 40 years dictated the pace of change in the technology industry.

To be sure, many, including Moore himself, have predicted the law's demise numerous times before. But, now, as Intel and the rest of the industry have made features on chips so small, they're running out of space to cram in more transistors and bumping against the laws of physics.

"Another decade, a decade and a half, I think we'll hit something fairly fundamental" that would render the continuing pace of Moore's law untenable, Moore said on Tuesday at Intel's twice-annual technical conference, now in its 10th year.

Intel in January announced what it hailed as the biggest breakthrough in the basic building blocks of semiconductors in more than 40 years. The world's biggest chipmaker is now using an element called hafnium and metal gates in its chipmaking processes, which will let Moore's Law continue for now.

Moore served as executive vice president of Intel until 1975, when he became president and chief executive. He was elected chairman in 1979 and remained CEO until 1987. He was named chairman emeritus in 1997.

Asked what he would do if he were a youngster in college again, Moore paused before saying, "I'd probably look at something more in the biology mold. The interface between computers and biology now is a very interesting area."

"It's an exciting time," Moore, an avid deep sea fisherman, said later in the discussion. "I'd love to come back in 100 years and see what happened in the meantime."


Previous
Next
HDMI Adopted by 700+ Manufacturers        All News        New Blu-Ray and HD DVD Desktop PC by LG
HDMI Adopted by 700+ Manufacturers     PC Parts News      New Blu-Ray and HD DVD Desktop PC by LG

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Intel To Work With AT&T To Research Software Defined Networking
Intel Meegopad T01 Is A Bay Trail PC On HDMI Stick
The Intel Experience Coming In Best Buy Stores
New Data Protection Tecnology Protects Point-of-sale Data
Intel Reports Record Third-Quarter Revenue
Intel Releases Internet of Things Developer Kit
Intel and Mitsubishi Electric Collaborate to Create Factory Automation Systems
Intel To Invest in Semiconductor Business under Tsinghua Unigroup
Latest Intel LTE Chipset Certified on China Mobile
Intel Offers Developers Software Tools, Outlines PC Evolution Across New Form Factors
Intel Unveils New Developer Tools, Future Technologies Tablets, Analytics, Wearable Devices and PCs at IDF 2014
New Intel Xeon E5-2600 v3 Processors Released

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .