Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Facebook Enjoys High First-quarter Revenue
Qualcomm Reports Less Than Expected 2Q Revenue
iPhone Sales Drive Apple's Record March Quarter Revenue
Travelling Through Time On Updated Google Maps
OnePlus One To Launch Next Month
LG Display Reports First Quarter Results
Toshiba Announces Canvio AeroMobile Wireless SSD
Global Chip Revenue Rises in 2013
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > Digital Cameras > Ultra-s...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, June 14, 2007
Ultra-sensitive Camera Sensor May Eliminate Flash


Kodak said on Thursday it has developed digital camera technology that nearly eliminates the need for flash photography.

The world's biggest maker of photographic film says its proprietary sensor technology significantly increases sensitivity to light. Image sensors act as a digital camera's eyes by converting light into an electric charge to begin the capture process.

Kodak said the new technology advances an existing Kodak standard in digital imaging. Today, the design of almost all color image sensors is based on the "Bayer Pattern," an arrangement of red, green, and blue pixels first developed by Kodak scientist Bryce Bayer in 1976.

In this design, half of the pixels on the sensor are used to collect green light, with the remaining pixels split evenly between sensitivity to red and blue light.

After exposure, software reconstructs a full color signal for each pixel in the final image. Kodak's new proprietary technology adds "clear" pixels to the red, green, and blue elements that form the image sensor array, collecting a higher proportion of the light striking the sensor.

Manufacturing customers interested in the design will likely get a chance to sample it in early 2008, although it is not sure when devices using the technology would be in stores. The technology could be used at first in devices such as cell phones and eventually products made for industrial and scientific imaging.


Previous
Next
SanDisk to Support DivX        All News        SimCity Returns to PC
BenQ Introduces New E820 and C740i Digital Cameras     Digital Cameras News      Nero PhotoShow Deluxe 4 Now Windows Vista Ready

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Toshiba Launches 13 Megapixel CMOS Image Sensor with High Speed Video Technology
Toshiba Introduces Bright Mode Video Technology for CMOS Image Sensors
Samsung Develops 20-mega pixel Camera For Smartphones
Toshiba Starts Mass Production of 1080p, 1.12 Micrometer, CMOS Image Sensor
Toshiba Launches 8-Megapixel, 1.12µm CMOS Image Sensor
Samsung Launches ISOCELL Image Sensor Technology For Mobile Devices
Kodak Emerges From Bankruptcy Focused on Imaging for Business
Judge Approves Kodak Plan to Exit Bankruptcy
Toshiba Launches 13 Megapixel CMOS Image Sensor With Color Noise Reduction
Kodak, Major Financial Institutions Agree to Arrange Exit Financing Package
Kodak Seeks Approval for $406 Million Rights Offering
Fujifilm and Panasonic Develop New Organic CMOS Image Sensor Technology

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .