Friday, October 24, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
HP Broadens Moonshot Portfolio With Intel-powered Models
Microsoft To Keep Nokia Brand For Low-end Smartphones
LG Introduces Its First Octa-Core Application Processor
Cloud and Surface 3 Drive Microsoft's Revenue
Micron Urges Investors To Reject TRC Capital's Unsolicited Tender Offer
Facebook Returns To Chat Roots With Rooms App
Sony SmartWatch 3 And LG G Watch R Are Rolling Out With Updated Android Wear Software
New Nvidia Driver Enable DSR On Older Graphics Cards
Active Discussions
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
 Home > News > General Computing > Google ...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Wednesday, June 13, 2007
Google to Dump User Data After 18 Months


Google promised to obscure information about people's Internet searches after only 18 months.

Google's global privacy counsel Peter Fleischer revealed late Monday that the firm's policy change in a letter to the Article 29 Data Protection Working Party in Belgium.

Fleischer's message was a response to a demand by Article 29 that Google justify why it doesn't conform to the Resolution on Privacy Protection and Search Engines adopted in London in November of 2006.

The resolution calls on search engines to erase data linking people to searches when sessions end unless they get permission to keep it.

Google announced in March a policy to edit data to render users anonymous after 18 to 24 months. Article 29 implied California-based Google is flaunting European regulations.

Google said it needs to keep information about searchers and their online explorations to protect its system against attacks; expose online scams and hackers; to improve the algorithm on which searches are based and to meet requirements by law enforcement.

The decision comes just a few days after London-based Privacy International, which has monitored rights protections on the Internet since its fledgling days, ranked Google "hostile to privacy."

Google scored lower in privacy protection than rivals Microsoft, Yahoo and AOL.


Previous
Next
Epson and Philips Release Reference Design for SVGA Projectors        All News        Fujifilm Introduces LabelFlash DVD Media to U.S. Market
Yahoo Teams Up With iTunes for Japanese iPod Users     General Computing News      Microsoft Patches Six Security Flaws

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Google Is Teaming up with Oxford University on Artificial Intelligence
Google Unveils Inbox
Google Play Music App To Follow Your Mood
Login To Google Using A USB Security Key
Google Reports Strong Quarter Despite CPC Decline
Google Announces New Android Lollipop, Nexus 6 Smartphone, Nexus 9 Tablet And Nexus Player Streamer
Google Reveals Flaw in SSL Protocol
Google Expands Shopping Service
Google To Launch Nexus phone, Android L This Month
Apple and Google Each worth more than USD $100
Google Could Be Making Modular Monitors
Google to Release New Mobile Chat App: report

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .