Monday, October 20, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Strong iPhone, Mac And App Store Sales Drive Apple's Record September Quarter Revenue And Earnings
Apple iOS 8.1 Available For Download
E FUN To Relase $179 Windows tablet
Microsoft And Dell Puts Azure In A Box
TDK Brings Wireless Charging To Electric Cars
Intel To Work With AT&T To Research Software Defined Networking
Intel Meegopad T01 Is A Bay Trail PC On HDMI Stick
Biostar Relases New iDEQ-T1 Compact Desktop
Active Discussions
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
Yamaha CRW-F1UX
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
 Home > News > General Computing > Russia ...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Monday, September 04, 2006
Russia enacts tough Internet piracy law


New legislation that threatens Internet pirates with jail terms of up to five years took effect in Russia, as Moscow presses its drive to join the World Trade Organization

The tough amendment to Russia's copyright protection law was approved by lawmakers in July 2004 and was aimed specifically at cracking down on illegal distribution through the Internet of text, music and video in mp3 format, the business daily Kommersant said Friday.

The amendment granted operators of Internet sites in Russia that distribute copyright-protected content two years to register with the authorities and acquire licenses for their activities. The law came into full force on Friday.

Relatively lax intellectual property protection in Russia has been a major stumbling block to the country's WTO bid. The United States, one of the only countries still refusing to endorse Russia's WTO entry, has cited intellectual property protection as one of its chief concerns.

Kommersant said Russian Internet site operators have actually registered with authorities as required, and cited estimates that around 97 percent of music files shared over the Internet in Russia today are illegal.

Legal sales of copyright-protected music over the Internet are estimated at less than one million dollars per year in Russia at present, while the real value of music traded online is believed to be between 25 and 30 million dollars, the paper said.

The new legislation marks an important political success for Economic Development Minister German Gref, who Kommersant noted has lobbied for years to get tougher intellectual property protection laws on the books.

Negotiations between Russia and the United States on Moscow's WTO membership -- thought likely to have been completed in time for the G8 summit hosted by Russia in July -- are continuing, with Russian officials saying they expect a deal by October.

Russia is the only major economy still not a member of the 149-country WTO. While the Kremlin insists it wants to join, officials also made clear earlier this year that Russia was prepared to forego WTO membership if it ran counter to the country's economic interests. ? AFP New legislation that threatens Internet pirates with jail terms of up to five years took effect in Russia, as Moscow presses its drive to join the World Trade Organization.

The tough amendment to Russia's copyright protection law was approved by lawmakers in July 2004 and was aimed specifically at cracking down on illegal distribution through the Internet of text, music and video in mp3 format, the business daily Kommersant said Friday.

The amendment granted operators of Internet sites in Russia that distribute copyright-protected content two years to register with the authorities and acquire licenses for their activities. The law came into full force on Friday.

Relatively lax intellectual property protection in Russia has been a major stumbling block to the country's WTO bid. The United States, one of the only countries still refusing to endorse Russia's WTO entry, has cited intellectual property protection as one of its chief concerns.

Kommersant said Russian Internet site operators have actually registered with authorities as required, and cited estimates that around 97 percent of music files shared over the Internet in Russia today are illegal.

Legal sales of copyright-protected music over the Internet are estimated at less than one million dollars per year in Russia at present, while the real value of music traded online is believed to be between 25 and 30 million dollars, the paper said.

The new legislation marks an important political success for Economic Development Minister German Gref, who Kommersant noted has lobbied for years to get tougher intellectual property protection laws on the books.

Negotiations between Russia and the United States on Moscow's WTO membership -- thought likely to have been completed in time for the G8 summit hosted by Russia in July -- are continuing, with Russian officials saying they expect a deal by October.

Russia is the only major economy still not a member of the 149-country WTO. While the Kremlin insists it wants to join, officials also made clear earlier this year that Russia was prepared to forego WTO membership if it ran counter to the country's economic interests.


Previous
Next
Samsung Introduces Portable Digital Audio Player        All News        Nero Mobile Makes Entertainment Portable
Dell to Use About 20 million AMD CPUs     General Computing News      AOL Shuts Down AOL Research

Source Link Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Search Engines Play A role In Piracy: study
UK 'Softens' Copyright Alert Program
U.S. Releases Trade Report On Worst Copyright Offenders
European ISPs May Be Ordered To Block User's Access To Pirated Content: court
Hotfile To Pay $80 Million In Settlement Case With MPAA
French Court Tackles Streaming and Download Sites
MPAA Lists The World's Most Notorious Markets For Illegal Film Distribution
Search Engines Encouraging Online Content Infringement: MPAA
France Drops Three-strikes Law
Australian Police Sized 80,000 Counterfeit DVDs
Web Piracy Does Not Affect Music Sales, Study Says
France Proposes Tougher Anti-Piracy Laws

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .