Saturday, February 28, 2015
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
New Draft Bill Focuses On Consumer Data Privacy
Uber Says Breach Affected 50K Drivers
Google Showcases Future Silicon Valley Headquarters
Lenovo Offers Free McAfee LiveSafe Following Superfish Security Concerns
Yahoo Gains Search Share
Twitter To Offer More User Safety Features
Google to Start Ranking Mobile-friendly Sites Higher
Qualcomm Extends LTE to Unlicensed Spectrum to Enhance Mobile Experiences
Active Discussions
burning
nvidia 6200 review
Hello
Burning Multimedia in track 0
I'm lazy. Please help.
sanyo e6 camera
need help on some cd burning...
Why Double Logins ?
 Home > News > General Computing > Chip Br...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, June 20, 2006
Chip Breaks Speed Record


IBM has built a transistor that runs about 100 times faster than current chips, a development that could pave the way for ultra-fast computers and wireless networks, the computing giant said on Monday.

Transistors are the basic building blocks of the processors found in everything from supercomputers to digital music players, and IBM achieved the record speeds by building one from silicon laced with exotic chemical element germanium.

"What we've been doing in the last several years is pushing the absolute limits of silicon technology," said Bernie Meyerson, head of semiconductor research for International Business Machines .

"What we've done in demonstrating this is that we're nowhere near having tapped the limits of silicon performance, and that's very encouraging," Meyerson said.

The transistor achieved a speed of 500 gigahertz, which is more than 100 times speedier than the fastest PC chips sold today, and about 250 times faster than the typical mobile telephone chip, Meyerson said.

That speed was hit only when IBM researchers, working with counterparts from the Georgia Institute of Technology, cooled the transistor to near absolute zero, but Meyerson said the device still ran at 300 gigahertz at room temperature.

Clay Ryder, president of Sageza Group, a technology market research firm, said the breakthrough should lead to faster processors, but ones that will run far below the top speed demonstrated by IBM.

"We can build a (race car) that can go 240 miles per hour, but is that what you're going to drive to work? No, but you learn things that you can put in mass-produced cars," Ryder said.

Most improvements in chip speeds over the years have come from shrinking the size of transistors, but IBM's approach is to tweak the silicon on the atomic level, meaning that transistors can be designed from the ground up with very specific applications in mind.

"That means you can have Babe Ruth-style scenarios where you step up and point the bat to left field and nail a shot there," Meyerson said.

Meyerson forecasts that the advances will show up in real products within a couple years, probably in chips to power super-fast wireless networks capable of moving a DVD-quality movie in as little as 5 seconds.


Previous
Next
Microsoft Releases new Windows Live Messenger        All News        Toshiba Targets Gamers With Three New Notebooks
Microsoft Releases new Windows Live Messenger     General Computing News      Microsoft's iPod On the Way

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
IBM Unveils New Storage Solutions Based on Micron's Flash
IBM BigInsights Introduces Machine Learning With R
IBM Says Popular Dating Apps Are Vulnerable to Hackers
Cloud Cryptographic Algorithm Protects Personal Data
IBM Posts Fourth-quarter Results
IBM Launches Powerful z13 Mainframe
IBM Retains U.S. Patent Record in 2014
Intel, IBM Follow Different Strategies On 14nm FinFET
Apple and IBM Bring Big Data Analytics and Security Capabilities on iPhone And iPad
Mobile Shopping Dominated During Thanksgiving And Black Friday
IBM Patents Cloud Privacy Engine
IBM Introduces Verse Business E-mail With Social Media Integration

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2015 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .