Sunday, August 20, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
YouTube TV expands to new markets
Facebook Tests News Stories Customized to Users' Interests
Google Home Now Supports Free Calls
Asus Unveils the ZenFone 4 Pro, ZenFone 4, ZenFone 4 Selfie Pro, and ZenFone 4 Selfie
Nokia 8 Shipped With ZEISS Optics
Apple is Getting Serious in TV Shows and Film Prospect
Acer's New 4K Projectors Bring the Benefits of Cinema Home
Fiat Chrysler Joins BMW, Intel, Mobileye in Autonomous Driving Team
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > Consumer Electronics > Volume ...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, March 30, 2006
Volume Limits on New iPod Software


Apple made a maximum volume setting available in its iPod software update released on Wednesday following complaints and a lawsuit saying the popular player can cause hearing loss.

The free download applies to the iPod Nano and the iPod models with video-playback capabilities. Parents will also be able to set a locked limit on their child's players with a code.

Greg Joswiak, Apple's iPod Marketing Vice President, said it was responding to "increased attention in this area. We want to offer customers an easy to use option to set their own personal volume limit," he said.

The company has posted online a brief analysis about sound, advising users of iPods, computers and other devices to adopt common sense and "listen responsibly" when using headphones or earbuds.

Earlier this month, the U.S.National Institutes of Health said new studies were needed into the effects of in-ear headphones.

It was responding to calls by U.S. congressman Edward Markey for research into the possible long-term effects of loud music on hearing. Health experts in general want more studies into the effect of earphones.

Apple is furthermore facing a U.S.legal action claiming its iPod can damage hearing. John Kiel Patterson, of Louisiana, is suing Apple in the U.S. District Court in San Jose, California.

He says his iPod is capable of generating more than 115 decibels, a dangerous noise level if a person is exposed to the sound for more than 28 seconds a day.

Although the iPod is more popular than other types of portable music players, its ability to cause hearing loss isn't any higher, experts said.


Previous
Next
Patent System Questionned in eBay Case        All News        Western Digital Offers 6GB Pocket Drive
Watch TV on the Go     Consumer Electronics News      NeoDigits Launches new HD Players

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Apple is Getting Serious in TV Shows and Film Prospect
ITC to Investigate Apple
New Apple Patent Describes How a front-facing camera and Sensors Take Health Measurements
HomePod code: Dual 4K Cameras for New iPhone and 4K AppleTV with HDR10 Support
Apple to Add LTE Connectivity to Watches
Healthy iPhone sales Boost Apple's Results, Augmented Reality Could be the next Big Thing
Chinese Apple App Store Delists VPN Software
Apple Discontinues the iPod Nano and Shuffle
Intel, Microsoft and Amazon Side with Apple in Qualcomm's iPhone Ban Dispute
Apple Turns to LG Chem for iPhone 9 Batteries
iPhone Manufacturers Accuse Qualcomm of Antitrust Violations
Apple to Store Data China to Comply With New Chinese Law

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .