Tuesday, September 26, 2017
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Teardown Reveals What Higher Apple iPhone 8 Plus Cost Actually Buys
Samsung Starts Producing First 128-GB eUFS for Automobiles
Toshiba MG06 Series Includes 10TB Enterprise Capacity SATA HDD
USB 3.2 Specification Published
LG Joins the Xfinity TV Partner Program
Deloitte Email Platform and Client Data Hacked
macOS High Sierra Now Available for Download
Intel's New Loihi Self-Learning Chip Promises to Accelerate Artificial Intelligence
Active Discussions
Which of these DVD media are the best, most durable?
How to back up a PS2 DL game
Copy a protected DVD?
roxio issues with xp pro
Help make DVDInfoPro better with dvdinfomantis!!!
menu making
Optiarc AD-7260S review
cdrw trouble
 Home > News > PC Parts > New Chi...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, December 08, 2005
New Chip Materials Extend Moore's Law


Chip makers are currently focusing on new metrails other than silicon, that will allow their chips to operate faster and they will consume less energy. Intel said that it has developed a new, low power prototype transistor using new materials that could form the basis of its microprocessors.

Intel and QinetiQ researchers have jointly demonstrated an enhancement-mode transistor using indium antimonide (chemical symbol: InSb) to conduct electrical current. Transistors control the flow of information/electrical current inside a chip. According to Intel, the prototype transistor is much faster and consumes less power than previously announced transistors. Intel anticipates using this new material to complement silicon, further extending Moore's Law.

Significant power reduction at the transistor level, accompanied by a substantial performance increase, could play a crucial role in delivering future platforms to computer users by allowing an increased number of features and capabilities.

"The results of this research reinforce our confidence in being able to continue to follow Moore?s Law beyond 2015," said Ken David, director of components research for Intel's Technology and Manufacturing Group. moore's law claims that transistor counts within a specific area will double within 18 to 24 months.

InSb is in a class of materials called III-V compound semiconductors which are in use today for a variety of discrete and small scale integrated devices such as radio-frequency amplifiers, microwave devices and semiconductor lasers.

The prototype transistors being announced Wednesday had a gate length of 85nm. Note that today's mass-produced transistors have typically a gate length of 50 nm in a 90 nm production process. The 65 nm chip generation, which will debut early January, will reduce the transistor gate length to 35 nm. Intel's prototype transistors are able to operate at a reduced voltage, about 0.5 volts - roughly half of that for transistors in today?s chips.

Details will be provided at the IEDM conference Dec. 5-7, in Washington, D.C., where the formal paper describing this advancement will be delivered.


Previous
Next
ULi Introduces High-Def PCI Express Chip        All News        DVD Sales Nearing Global Peak
ULi Introduces High-Def PCI Express Chip     PC Parts News      AMD And IBM Unveil 65nm Process Technologies

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Intel's New Loihi Self-Learning Chip Promises to Accelerate Artificial Intelligence
8th Generation Intel Core "Coffee Lake" Desktop Processors are Launching today
Intel Showcases 10 nm Updates, a new aspect for Moore's Law, FPGA Progress and 64-Layer 3D NAND for Data Center
Waymo's Self-Driving Car to have Intel Chips Inside
Facebook Opens AI Research in Montreal
IBM and MIT to Establish MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab
European Top Judges Send Intel Antirust Case Back to Lower Court
IFA: Huawei Says it Has an Edge Over Apple With New Kirin 970 Mobile AI Chipset
Intel Releases Xeon-W Processors For Workstations
Intel's Movidius X VPU Announced
Microsoft Unveils Project Brainwave for Real-time AI
Intel First 8th generation Processors Released

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2017 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .