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Wednesday, November 09, 2005
JupiterReasearch Forecasts an Ongoing Threat to Cookies From Anti-spyware Applications


In a report entitled: "Anti-Spyware and Tracking Cookies: A Systematic Look at Risks to Third-Party Tracking Cookies from Popular Anti-Spyware," JupiterResearch details the impact of anti-spyware software on cookies that companies use to track visitors to their Web sites.

With recommendations for site operators and technology vendors, the JupiterResearch report finds that over 48 million Internet users are running anti-spyware applications that delete third-party tracking cookies. And nearly 38 million are using aggressive anti-spyware applications that remove nearly 75% of tracking cookies.

"Given that 32% of Internet users, over 48 million people, report using an anti-spyware application that manages tracking cookies to some extent, the threat to third-party cookies is real," said Eric T. Peterson, Senior Analyst at JupiterResearch, "The average consumer is using more than one anti-spyware application on their computer, perhaps in an attempt to further protect themselves from unwanted spyware and tracking applications," added Peterson.

The significant use of anti-spyware software is occurring simultaneously with companies benefiting from the use of cookies. The report finds that companies moving to first-party cookies from third-party cookies typically see a 10% to 15% increase in unique visitors, 13% to 30% more repeat visitors and 10% to 30% more visitors attributed to specific marketing campaigns, all as a result of more accurate measurement.

"Cookie deletion and blocking has become a burning issue," said David Schatsky, Senior Vice President of Research at JupiterResearch. "Site operators must move quickly from third- to first-party cookies. Technology vendors should lobby anti-spyware vendors to remove their third-party cookies from the rolls of 'blacklisted domains' while strongly encouraging their customers to move to first-party cookies," added Schatsky.

The complete findings of this report are immediately available to JupiterResearch clients online at www.jupiterresearch.com.


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