Tuesday, September 02, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
webOS Is Still Alive With LuneOS ROM Release for Android, webOS Devices
AMD Launches AMD Radeon R9 285 Graphics, "Never Settle: Space Edition" Game Bundle
AMD Introduces New 8-core FX-series Processors
New Philips Hue Beyond Combines Functionality And Ambient Lighting for Home
LG and Samsung Add Swarovski Crystals on Their Products
Pioneer DDJ-WeGO3 Allows You To Mix Tracks from Spotify or iTunes
Apple's iCloud Could Have Allowed Celebrity Nude-Photo Leak
Google To Launch New Budget Phone In India
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > General Computing > Green L...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, October 13, 2005
Green Light to U.S Online Music Services in Europe


Companies that want to sell music online in the European Union can now get a single license to operate in all countries of the EU, the European Commission said Wednesday. The deceision could allow popular U.S music services to easier enter the European market.

"These licenses will make it easier for new European-based online services to take off," Internal Market and Services Commissioner Charlie McCreevy said in a statement.

Starting an online music service in Europe such as Apple Computer's iTunes currently requires the consent of dozens of license holders in each country--record labels, royalty collection societies, music publishers, and, in some cases, from the artists themselves.

The resulting lengthy negotiations pushed back the launch of services such as iTunes and Napster by months, and some popular U.S. music services such as Yahoo have yet to appear in Europe in part because of licensing red tape.

The Commission said in its guidelines to the industry on Wednesday that societies collecting royalty income on behalf of authors of music should henceforth have the right to operate across the EU, scrapping any territorial restrictions.

The Commission hopes this will end a situation whereby royalties owed to authors are not always distributed to them because of national barriers.


Previous
Next
Kingston Launches 667-MHz DDR2 SO-DIMM Memory        All News        LG Registers the "Super Multi" Name
New QuickTime Supports iPod video creation     General Computing News      Google, Comcast Consider Investing in AOL

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .