Sunday, April 20, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Ex-Apple CEO To Sell Mobiles In India
HTC Hired Ex-Samsung Marketing Officer
Xbox One Wolrdwide Sales Cross 5 million
Samsung Works With GLOBALFOUNDRIES On 14 nm FinFET Offering
Facebook To Find Nearby Friends
Console Sales Lift AMD's First Quarter Results
LG Expands 'Second Screen' TV Ecosystem With Open-Source SDK
Amazon Announces Kindle Service For Samsung Devices
Active Discussions
help questions structure DVDR
Made video, won't play back easily
Questions durability monitor LCD
Questions fungus CD/DVD Media, Some expert engineer in optical media can help me?
CD, DVD and Blu-ray burning for Android in development
IBM supercharges Power servers with graphics chips
Werner Vogels: four cloud computing trends for 2014
Video editing software.
 Home > News > Mobiles > In-flig...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Thursday, June 16, 2005
In-flight Cell Phone Systems Closer to Reality


The possibility of cell phone calls on airliners, for better or worse, took a few steps closer to reality this week with the announcement of two on-board cellular systems.

Telefonaktiebolaget LM Ericsson said Monday it will have an onboard GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) base station available by the end of the year. Also Monday, an in-flight cellular system from the AeroMobile partnership was exhibited on a new model of The Boeing Co.'s 777 airliner at the Paris Air Show.

Mobile technology vendors are lining up to serve what could be a huge market -- the International Commercial Aviation Organization counted almost 1.9 billion airline passengers last year -- but regulatory hurdles remain, along with concern over the possible social fallout from passengers being allowed to talk in a crowded airliner cabin.

Cell phone use on airliners has not been allowed because of possible interference with the plane's navigation system as well as with the ground-based cell network. The U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) last December proposed a rule change that would allow the use of some cell phones.

Ericsson took its existing RBS 2000 family base station design, reduced its size and weight and introduced the RBS 2708, according to Ericsson spokesman Peter Olofsson. It also added an electromagnetic screening device and a special enclosure that prevent the base station from interfering with the plane's navigation system or ground-based cell towers, he added.

As many as 60 passengers could make or receive calls at one time on the base station, which uses a satellite uplink to connect to the land-based phone network. Multiple RBS 2708 base stations could be installed on a large plane in order to give more passengers coverage, Olofsson said. The system would require some management but would be easy for an airliner crew to handle, he said. It works on the 1800MHz frequency and supports GPRS (General Packet Radio Service) and EDGE (Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution) data networks.

AeroMobile, formed by Arinc Inc. and Norwegian carrier Telenor ASA, showed off a cell system that can use the existing Inmarsat satellite communications systems in most long-haul planes as an uplink, according to an AeroMobile news release. AeroMobile's system will travel with the Boeing B777-20LR Worldliner on a world promotional tour later this year, AeroMobile said.

In-flight cellular coverage could be provided by an airline, an aircraft manufacturer or a mobile operator and carry a standard roaming charge, Ericsson's Olofsson said. Passengers could start using their GSM phones as soon as the plane reached its cruising altitude and could continue to use them while flying over oceans because of the satellite uplink. The crew could turn off the system at night or at other times out of consideration for other passengers, he said.

All GPRS and EDGE data services as well as text messaging would also be available, though delays inherent in the satellite uplink cause GPRS to work more slowly than usual, according to Olofsson. Although the initial system will use only 1800MHz, a frequency commonly used for GSM in Europe and elsewhere but not in North America, it would not be hard to modify the design to use other frequencies in the future, he said. Future products could also support UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunications System) high-speed data, though the speed of the satellite uplink could limit passengers' data experience.

Though Ericsson is set to offer its base station this year and other vendors have demonstrated working systems, it's not clear when regulators will be ready for age of ringtones in the air. In the U.S. alone, both the FCC and the Federal Aviation Administration would have to approve the change.

Ericsson is confident that day will come.

Bob Egan, an analyst at Mobile Competency, in Providence, Rhode Island, isn't so sure.

"While technically, I think we could see approval on newer airplanes (within 12 months), there are some procedural and governmental issues that may be more significant," Egan said.

For one thing, the U.S. Department of Justice, Department of Homeland Security and Federal Bureau of Investigation reportedly expressed concern recently about terrorists using cell phones to plan attacks or set off bombs on planes. And in comments to the FCC last month, the National Consumers League and the Association of Flight Attendants submitted the results of a survey in which 63 percent of respondents favored keeping the cell-phone ban in place. Airlines will have to look at the welfare of their employees and of the passengers as a whole before they allow cell phones on their planes, Egan said.


Previous
Next
Nvidia Cuts Prices On Processors        All News        IBM Targets CE with Low-Power 65nm ASIC
Benq to Reduce New Handset Models After Siemens Pact     Mobiles News      Nokia, Apple Develop Open Source Browser

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Samsung May Delay Galaxy S4 Due To Panel Manufacturing Issues
LG Optimus G LTE Smartphone Shipping Next Month
New Quad-core LG Smartphone Coming In September
Samsung Says External Source Caused Galaxy S III Fire
Galaxy Chat To Hit European Shelves This Month
Samsung Expects To Sell 10 mln Galaxy S3 Smartphones By End of July
Weak Supply Of HD Displays Will Limit Shipments Of High-end Smartphones
LG Launching Voice Recognition Service Challenging Apple's Siri And S Voice
Samsung Makes Android SAFE For Enterprises
Sharp Showcases Its "Feel UX" User Interface For Smartphones
LG Optimus L5 Makes Global Debut
LG's Quad-core Optimus 4X HD Available In Europe

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .