Friday, November 28, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Syrian Electronic Army targets CNBC, Telegraph, Independent, PCWorld
GoPro Camera Drones In The Works: report
European Parliament Votes To Break Up Google
LG Electronics Streamlines Structure, Names New Presidents of Home and Mobile Segments
Microsoft Accidentally Anounced Acquisition Of Acompli
Microsoft Offers Massive Music Deals For The Holidays
ETRI Develops 10Gbps Internet Speeds Technology
New Asus Strix 7.1 Surround Gaming Headset Released
Active Discussions
Hi All!
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
 Home > News > General Computing > 200 Swe...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Tuesday, June 07, 2005
200 Swedish file-sharers reported to the police


The war on illegal file-sharing has stepped up a notch in Sweden, with 200 people having been reported to the police for breaking copyright laws for exchanging games and films online.

The development marks a change of approach for Sweden's anti-piracy group, Antipiratbyrεn (APB). The organisation has sent out 400,000 warning letters in its controversial battle with file-sharers. But in response, over 1,000 people have reported APB to the Swedish authorities for breaking personal data laws by collecting IP addresses of suspected miscreants.

Now, while it waits for a decision on the matter from the Swedish Data Inspection Board, APB has decided to stop using its own data collection software and report suspects directly to the police.

"We have other methods than storing IP addresses for tracing people who break copyright laws concerning films and games," said APB's lawyer, Henrik Pontιn, who told Computer Sweden that he does not believe an IP address could be classed as personal data.

"We are not taking a legal risk if we continue to send out warning letters. But we want to show that we respect the legislation."

Currently it is not illegal to download copyrighted films and music in Sweden - only to distribute them. But the Swedish parliament passed a law banning all participation in file-sharing last month, which means that from July 1st file-sharers will be ordered to pay damages or face up to two years in prison.

Meanwhile, the Swedish file-sharing site The Pirate Bay has made clear its position on the debate by relaunching with faster technology and in ten other languages.

"In contrast to the big media companies we see it as our duty to spread new technology to as many people as possible," said The Pirate Bay's Fredrik Neij.


Previous
Next
BenQ Introduces Monitors with Advanced Motion Accelerator Technology        All News        Seiko Epson unveils cheaper rear-projection TVs
JPEG competitor launched     General Computing News      Apple aligns with Intel: From Tiger to Leopard

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
France Proposes Tougher Anti-Piracy Laws
Copyright Alert System Set to Begin in The U.S.
British Music Industry To Block More BitTorrent Sites
CCI To Dealy 'Six-strike' Anti-piracy Campaign Until 2013
U.S. Copyright Surveillance Machine About To Be Switched On
Megaupload To Launch Again next Year
Torque Brings BitTorrent To The Browser
BitTorrent Lauches Paid Version Of µTorrent
New EU Law Precludes ISPs To Be Forced to Monitor P2P Users
BitTorrent Launches μTorrent 3.0
BitTorrent Updated With Personal Content Channels
The Pirate Bay Becomes Research Bay

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .