Sunday, November 23, 2014
Search
  
Submit your own News for
inclusion in our Site.
Click here...
Breaking News
Regin Trojan Enables Stealthy Surveillance: Symantec
ASTC Says 100 TB HDDs Coming in 2025
Alienware Alpha PC Gaming Console Now Shipping
Samsung Files ITC Complaint Against Nvidia
Europe To Ask Google Unlink Its Commercial And Search Services
Streaming TV Service Aereo Files for Bankruptcy
Square Launches Cash Register Service
Call of Duty: Advanced Warfare is the Biggest Entertainment Launch of 2014
Active Discussions
cdrw trouble
CDR for car Sat Nav
DVD/DL for Optiarc 7191S at 8X
Copied dvd's say blank in computer only
Made video, won't play back easily
New Features In Firefox 33
updated tests for dvd and cd burners
How to generate lots of different CDs quickly
 Home > News > General Computing > Napster...
Last 7 Days News : SU MO TU WE TH FR SA All News

Friday, February 18, 2005
Napster refutes claims of flawed protection


Less than three weeks after Napster began touting its all-you-can-rent music subscription service, the company finds itself refuting Internet claims that its copy-protection measures are flawed.

The company posted a message this week, saying the service's digital music tracks are no more susceptible to unauthorized copying than any other licensed music service.

The statement comes after word surfaced on the Internet about how subscribers of Napster To Go, which lets users play an unlimited number of tracks on their computer or on certain portable devices for about $15 a month, could make permanent copies of the songs.

The method involves downloading a free audio player that is able to record audio directly from a computer's sound card, bypassing copy-protection technology designed to prevent copying.

Such a method could potentially harm the prospects for the company's new service.

In its statement, the company compared the process described on the Internet to copying songs from the radio onto cassette tapes.

"This program does not break the encryption of the files, which can only be recorded one at a time making the process quite laborious," the company said. "It would take 10 hours to convert 10 hours of music in this manner."

Despite efforts to use copy-protection technology on CDs and within digital tracks, most, if not all, fail to block recording of analog audio signals.

"As long as you can listen to the music, there's going to be a way to capture it like this," said Michael Gartenberg, an analyst with Jupiter Research.


Previous
Next
EU software patent law faces axe        All News        Sega announces next-gen game
EU software patent law faces axe     General Computing News      Japan's Sony to take on iPod

Get RSS feed Easy Print E-Mail this Message

Related News
Rhapsody and Napster Wind Down Partnership With Echo Nest
Best Buy to Buy Napster For $121 million
Napster Launches MP3 Store
Napster to Offer 100% DRM-Free MP3 Downloads
AT&T to Offer Napster on Samsung SLM
Napster, AT&T in Wireless Music Tie-up
AOL Signs Napster as Music Subscription Service
Napster launches Japanese service
One-time music industry nemesis matures into copyright guardian
Napster Considers Selling Up
Napster to Offer Music For Free
Napster Says It's Microsoft's Fault

Most Popular News
 
Home | News | All News | Reviews | Articles | Guides | Download | Expert Area | Forum | Site Info
Site best viewed at 1024x768+ - CDRINFO.COM 1998-2014 - All rights reserved -
Privacy policy - Contact Us .