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Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 3/15/2002 11:54:36 PM   
mj12

 

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I have a Plextor burner and want to burn a bunch of CD's for my wedding as gifts. I will dump wav's from my cd collection then burn the wavs to CDR's. What would you recommend as best quality for doing this. Longevity and quality are needed.

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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 3/16/2002 11:49:17 AM   
monkuboy

 

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I am rather new to cd burning, but I have done a lot of research (comments on forums, pro reviews, etc.) and it appears to me that the ones made by Taiyo Yuden are trustworthy. They're actually the manufacturer. Brands out there like Verbatim, TDK, Sony, Imation, etc., don't make their own cdr's, they buy them from factories. The problem is, they buy from different ones so you can't just go by the brand on the disk. For example, I bought some TDK 32x because of the TDK name, but my 32x Liteon / Nero would only allow 12x recording! Then I found out the TDK's are made by Ritek, which a lot of people say is junk. I would suggest buying a "name" brand and then looking on the package to see where it is made. In general, people rate those made in Japan higher than those made in Taiwan. I bought some Fujifilm cdr's because the package said "made in Japan," and found out they were made by Taiyo Yuden. And even though they are 24x rated, I can record at 32x on my Liteon.

In summary, it seems to me the consensus is discs made in Japan are of better quality, so check out the package before you buy.



Edited by - monkuboy on 03/16/2002 11:50:44

(in reply to mj12)
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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 3:29:05 AM   
rjw

 

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Not completely true.
Most verbatim disc's are made by Mitsubitshi Chemical. And Mitsubitshi is the owns the brand verbatime.
Most Sony 32x are actually made by Sony.
(That's no good point since the Mitsui and Taiyo Yuden ones are better.)
By the way the TDK ritek's aren't bad with most burners at least the 16x/24x was. Allways remember that media and burner are 2 things that have to match.
Look at the 40x of Lite On the writing quality and media Compatibility is much more worse than the 24x/32x Lite On's.
The end result is that with old/low quality disc's the drive is even slower and creates more coasters with this media as the 24x and the 32x Lite On's. However most other 40x writers have the same problems.


Now to mJ12.
Since I think you want 100% playback compatibility allong with good disc's . So that allmost all cd-players can play your cd-r. Take a look at Mitsui (silver). They do cost more. However in most older players. Who doesn't like cd-r's these disc's seem to outperform there competitors. If your ussing the 24x plex don't go faster as 16x since the writing quality for most disc's at 20x and 24x isn't as good as the 16x.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 10:09:17 AM   
mikeku

 

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Hi,

I'm also new but I thought that I would offer my two cents.

I recently had a very bad experience with Imation disks made by CMC. I made a bunch of photo CDs for family gifts (in 2001). I recently had to go back to the disks to retrieve a photo and four different drives wouldn't read them! I even tried some "test disks" that I had made which also failed. These disks did play fine when they were made so I'm assuming that they degraded in some way. I was eventually able to read them on a liteon drive (and I did make a backup).

It is hard to imagine that a disk would normally go bad in such a short time so I'm assuming that this particular batch was bad. I imagine that many of the cheap disk companies buy their chemicals from the lowest bidder so it would be possible to combine bad chemical and poor quality control to produce a bad disk.

A lot of people like Ritek disks but an article from CD Media World (http://cdmediaworld.com) said that they could not handle the aging process at all. I don't know if Ritek disks have changed since the article was written.

Certain companies consistenly come up when the word "quality" is used. Within these companies their "premium" disks seem to do better then their standard disk (espcially when it come to longevity).

Companies that are often given good ratings inclue:
Kodak
Taiyo Yuden
Ricoh Premium
Mitsui
Pioneer

Mitsubishi (Verbatum), Fuji and Hitachi were considered OK (not as good as the top disks)

They did not like disks make by Prino, Gogastorage, Lead Data, Fornet, Ritek and CMC (at least for longevity).

Of interest, they had a batch of TraxData (Ritek) that was ultra sensitive to UV light. The disks were so bad that they could actually read the TraxData logo in the errors! I'm not sure if Ritek has since improved their quality control.

The bottom line was that most cheap disks can work with today's recorders and they are OK for casual use or stuff that you don't want to archive. More expensive disks seem to last longer prehaps due to tighter control over the chemicals or manufacturing process. They also may do simple things like make the coating on the back of the CD thicker which could make a disk more durable.

After my Imation dissater I went "disk hunting" in the suburbs of Chicago. I bought brands ranging from no-names to Maxell. The vast majority of the disks (using CD identifier) were from "low quality" factories. The more expesive disks were typically by Ritek. In fact the only brand named disk I could find was from Sony (made by Sony). This particular brand was not listed in the article, but I would bet that they are probably OK. Based on my "unscientific" survey it would seem that buying CD-Rs is a crap shoot if you buy local. In fact one company may buy their CD's from factory A one time and factory B the next. If you want to buy a better disk you are probably best off if you buy from the internet from places like Koday or CDR planet.

OK, this is just my opinion. I'm sure others feel differently. I don't claim to be an expert...I just did the research based on my own terrible experience.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 12:49:00 PM   
monkuboy

 

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I guess now I'm putting in 3 cents..

I agree, compatability is important. Just because you have a good quality disk doesn't mean the cd-rw will be compatible. However, my feeling is that in trying to find the "compatible" disk, one should purchase a sample but limit it only to media manufactured in Japan. Most packages state the location on the label (in fine print somewhere) but I have seen some, like the "GQ" label offered at Fry's, that gives no indication where it was made. Of course, given the very low price and absence of information, I would avoid such disks.

Also, you can use cdr-identifier to tell you who is the actual manufacturer of the disk.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 9:37:13 PM   
mikeku

 

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Hi Monkuboy,

I have heard the advice from other "poster" to buy disks from Japan. They seem to be in short supply in Chicagoland area (at least in the cheesy stores that I shop in). The only disk that I could find from Japan was a TDK DVD-R disk. Most of the disks that I found were made in Taiwan. I did find two exotics: a "Hi-Space" disk made in France and a Sony Audio CD-R made in Austria. Do you know if Ritek has improved, name brand companies like TDK seem to be using them.


(in reply to mj12)
Post #: 6
RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 9:49:23 PM   
monkuboy

 

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Hi Mikeku-

The majority of the disks I've seen out here (Southern Calfornia) are also made in Taiwan. The reviews I've read, forum postings, and personal experience are in favor of disks made in Japan by Taiyo Yuden. I've seen some web sites that sell Taiyo Yuden disks (don't remember which ones, just type that in a search engine), and also seen them on E-Bay.. but I don't know anything about the reliability of the stores. Sony has a plant in Austria, but don't know anything about it. As for Ritek, one professional review said their disks were not made for longevity.. I do know that they are on Liteon's approved list of manufacturers, and supposedly their firmware has been updated to fully utilize Ritek disks made by TDK at their full rated speed.

Also, I read some posts in another forum (sorry I can't be more specific but they all seem to blend together) where several people were cursing TDK for switching to Ritek.

Anyway, I wish you luck in finding some disks - I would think that Chicago would have a pretty wide selection?


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 10:25:53 PM   
mikeku

 

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I would have thought that Chicago would have a pretty good selection of CDRs too. I checked out CompuUSA, OfficeMax, Office Depot and Global Computer. My guess is that the CMC and Ritek disks are cheaper to purchase and so the more expensive manufacturers are losing contracts to them. The stores that I checked out try to offer "low low prices." I guess that means cheap, cheap CDR's. I read in a post that Best Buy had Fuji disks made in Japan. I'll check them out. The Kodak site is also selling their disks at (I think) $15 for 50. These are only rated at 16x but I had great success in the past using them. They used to be available at a local computer store (Microcenter) but now all they have are cheap Taiwan brands.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 10:27:34 PM   
mikeku

 

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Sorry for the double post...sticky mouse finger.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/1/2002 10:32:07 PM   
monkuboy

 

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I figure you must have a Circuit City out your way.. the ones out here sell Fujifilm 24x media made by Taiyo Yuden (comes in a 30 pack with slim cases.. but you have to look out because they also sell Fujifilm made in Taiwan - same shelf, too). At the Best Buy out here, it is harder to find ones made in Japan but they have a good selection so you ought to be able to find something. If you see Fujifilm made in Japan, then it is by Taiyo Yuden. Good luck!

By the way, I see Circuit City also sells TDK's made in Japan, but again, they sell other TDK's made in Taiwan.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/2/2002 10:51:30 PM   
mikeku

 

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I was out in a far Western Chicago Suburb (Joliet) today and checked out their Best Buy and Office Max. Best Buy had 50 Fuji packs that were Taiyo Yuden. Office Max had Memorex 50 and 100 spindles. The 50's were from Taiwan but the 100's (identical label) were Taiyo Yuden's. I guess I just have to keep my eyes open.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/2/2002 10:56:42 PM   
monkuboy

 

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At least you found something. You do need to read the fine print. I'm not so sure that everything made in Japan is Taiyo Yuden, however. There's a couple of other factories with Japanese names, like Mitsubishi Chemical and one other one that starts with an "m" but whose name I can't recall. Of these, Taiyo Yuden is supposed to be the best.

Given a choice between Fujifilm and Memorex, I would choose Fujifilm. I don't trust anything made by Memorex. This goes back to when I used to buy reel-to-reel and cassette tapes, and Memorex stuff was junk.


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RE: Best CDR for Audio and Longevity - 4/12/2002 2:45:01 PM   
CrazyMck

 

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Hi People

Liked all the info posted.
I too am looking for qaulity disks for my precious home videos. Want to make master (site on the self) copies that will last at least ten years till I transfer them to a newer/better technology.

I want to get some info on these new BLack disks. Any info would be apriciated -- i.e. Why are they using black now, cheaper, better , longer lasting -- is there a better manufacturer ....

Any info or direction to would be appreciated.

Take Care
Patrick

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